PUDDINGMOOR

 
 

 
 

 
 

gifts 

1439/2
1452/1
1491/1
177 

Byrlyngham, Jn
Pareys, John 
Walpoll, Kath 
West, Quaker (in Puddingmoor) 

roadway Puddingmoor
roadway Puddingmoor
repairof Puddingmoor

1 * 

 
 

 
 

1 & 1
 
 
1781 listed Poor Law

Dowe, Alice 
Dowe, Thomas [Alice] 
Lystere, Margt

Wife 

Dowe, Thomas 
1462/2

1462/2
Wife 
Puddingmoor 

Puddingmoor
Dowe, Thomas 

mess 
close

 

Puddingmoor 
next Garneys place 

 
 
 
 
 
 
1427/1
5
 
 
 
 
* 
I
DEATHS IN PLAGUE YEAR

STAPLETON Mary d of William & Alice 
STAPLETON Richard s of William & Alice 

 

1597 
1597 

466 
455 

8 September
24 August 

Puddingmoor 09
Puddingmoor 09

 

1433 & 1442  Manor Court
 
 
28 
127 
130 
129 
90 
92 

Coteler, Richard
Goodall, Thomas
? , Henry 
Coleler, Res 
Cook, Thomas 
Fox, Alex 
Godale, Thomas
Mennk, Matthew

brewer of beer 
brewer of beer/ infringements 
infringements 
infringements 
infringements 
infringements 
brewer of beer 
brewer of beer 

 
 

Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 

1433 
1433 
1442
1442
1442
1442
1442
1442

0.04 
0.04 
0.01 
0.04 
0.04 
0.04 

 
 
 
 
 
 

The Plague 1665

The plague appeared  in the spring of 1665 & continued until the end of 1666. It was the last  and  the worst of the attacks of
bubonic plagues  since the first, the Black Death in 1348/49.
London was the chief centre. Over 30,000 deaths were recorded in September 1665, but it spread elsewhere.
From the Feoffees accounts it is clear that many precautions were taken against the plague entering  Beccles, preventing people
from coming into the town from outside. Someone by the name of Marshall (his Christian name is not given) tried to return to the
house he had rented from Widow Hill, number 64 Northgate, (the house to the north of Montagu House), but was stopped by the
precautionary watch, both by land and water. A temporary hut had been provided, guarded by day and night, and arrangements
were made for returning the infected persons to Yarmouth. They paid  Marshall  8 to leave the town and gave someone 6d to
consign to the bottom of the Waveney “the things they had left behind”.
The watchmen were paid and also given bread, beer and tobacco also candles.
Aldous was given 2 shillings “for going in a boat to stop them” and four men were paid 3 shillings & two pence “to keep them out
at their first coming”.
It  seems  that  as  a  result  of  these  precautions  the  plague did not enter Beccles. The man who was probably responsible for
organizing the arrangements was Robert Brownrigg, who was a member of the feoffees and had lived in Beccles, in Northgate
House,  since  1660.  He  died  in  1669  and  at  that  time  was  recorded  in  the minute book of the Feoffees an unusual, personal  
statement:
“a counsellor at law and Justice of the Peace, a master of Chancery, extraordinary, and beyond all these titles, he was a religious
and very honest Man. - John Dade”.
In Yarmouth 2,500 people died of the plague in 1665 including the two clergymen. It also raged at Belton, closer to Becccles. It was
surprising that it was keept out of Beccles.

827 
825 
826 
834 
837 

75 
75 
75 
75 
75 

Covenant 
Covenant 
Covenant 
afterwards 
late 

1680 
1680 
1680 
1680 
Pud 

Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Boatswaine, John

Bitton, Edw/Yarmouth 
Bitton, John/Shipmeadow
Bitton, Wm/Carlton Colv

Boatswaine, John

 
yeoman
 
 
south

property
property
property
property

 
 

1680 
1680 

 

833 
831 
830 
823 
824 
838 
828 
829 

75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 
75 

formerly
Covenant 
Covenant 
Covenant 
Covenant 
sometime
Covenant 
Covenant 

Pud 
1680 
1680 
1680 
1680 
Pud 
1680 
1680 

Dennington, Edw
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Pud 
Mason, John 
Pud 
Pud 

 
Denny, Anne wife
Denny, William
Lincoln, Robert/Gisleham
Lincoln, Sarah wife
 

 
 
 

property
 
locksmithproperty
gent 
 
south
 
 

property

property
 

property
1680 

 
Payne, John/Ringsfield 

 

property
property

Payne, Mary wife
Street: Church path

 
 

835 
75 
Street 
1680 
Pud 
 
north

839 
836 
652 
651 
650 
656 

75 
75 
62 
62 
62 
62 

Street 
sometime
1st part
1st part
1st part
3rd part

1680 
1680 
1750 
1750 
1750 
1750 

Pud 
Pud 
Pud A  AA 
Pud A  AA 
Pud A  AA 
Pud A  AA 

Street: Puddingmoor
Warne, Francis 

 
Bendy, Mary wife Wm senior 
Bendy, William decsd 
Bendy, William son 
Carpenter, Philip

 
south

 
property
tanner 
property

property
 
d of Wm Mash

 
 
 

property
 

655 
653 
654 
657 
barn mill
658 
1780/01/01 

62 
62 
62 
62 

3rd part
1st part
2nd part

Street 

1750 
1750 
1750 
1750 

Pud A  AA 
Pud A  AA 
Pud A  AA 
Pud A  AA 

Carpenter, Wm younger
Mash, William
 
Mash, William 
Street: Puddingmoor 

yeoman
yeoman
 
 

property
property
property
property

 
 

 
of Gillingham
 
Tan Office 
Bark
62 

Street 
Cropley, Miss 

1750 

Pud AAB
school 

Street: Puddingmoor 
school opens 14 gns

property
Pud

 
Wilds mead 
adjoining tan office
school 
1852 Beccles Manor

28 
29 
54 
141 
200 

Bexfield, Benjamin
Bexfield, Benjamin
Chinery, Charles 
Howman, Dorothy L 
Stone, Mrs 

0.02 
0.01 
1.005 

Jones, Sarah 
 
 
0.045 
0.01 


 
 
 
Dykes, Roe 

 
 
 

 
 
 
1 10s 
 

 
waste enclosure 
limekiln
 
 

 
Pud 15



 

Pud 15
 
Land 21ft & pump
 

Pud 18

Pud 27
Pud 27.1

 

 
 

65 
52 
220 
46 
64 
66 
201 
47 

Crowfoot, William E 
Crabtree, John 
Woodthorpe, Thomas 
Buckley R & others
Crowfoot, William E 
Crowfoot, William E 
Stone, Mrs 
Buckley R & others

0.01 
Farr 
0.1 
 
0.035 
0.01 
0.01 
Bendy 

Rede 

Lambert

Rede 
Rede 
Dykes, Baxter 

 
 

 


Pud 
 
Pud 
 
 

Pud 

 
Pickerel
Pud 
tent 
 
 
 

 
 
messe & yard 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Pud 38

Pud 27.2
0.105 
Pud 40
0.05 

Pud AA
 
 
 
Pud NN

Pud AA
Pud BB
Pud BB

 
1.05 

 
2 10s 

2 tents
ancient messe stood here 

48 
Buckley R & others
0.1 
Leyland
 
Pud SP

35 
cements

02/02/1857 
Advert
Fenn, George 
Pud 
Lime Kiln 
(late Chenery) new lime, coals, slates, tiles, laths,

1872 
 
men  
1872 

Beccles Paper 16 Apr 

SMALLPOX: Death of 2 men, Wilson. 2 women also died. The man left the house in Puddingmoor after
the death of the woman and went to the house where they subsequently died. After the death of the
the women went back to their old house carrying the infection.
ALLEGED DUCK STEALING, 

 
 

 
 

Beccles Paper 6 Aug 

Robert Gosling, Beccles, labourer, was charged with having, on the 21st of July, stolen two live ducks,
the property of Robert Clark, of the Pickerel, Mr. Smith appeared for defendant.
The prosecutor, who gave his evidence in a somewhat incoherent manner, proved that he had ten ducks
safe when he went to bed at ten o’clock. He was called up about twelve by Noah Gray, [who lived at 11
Puddingmoor] and then missed five ducks, but the next morning he found two more in a neighbour’s
garden, and so had only lost three. About half-past five or six two ducks were brought to his house by
the police, which were his property. There was one old one – a black and white duck, and a young one
-a dark grey. The feathers produced were the feathers of the ducks. He valued them at 2s. 6d. 
By Mr. Smith : Never got drunk, hadn’t money enough ; the ducks’ feathers produced were his; always
went to bed about ten. Had been robbed every year he had lived in the Pickerel. Knew it was 12 o’clock,
as any one else would, when the clock struck. Didn’t hear the clock strike. Didn’t see these ducks after
seven o’clock the night they were stolen; he didn’t sit up half the night as to watch his ducks.
Noah Gray, of Puddingmoor, Beccles, labourer, said: My house is on the opposite side of the way, a
little higher up than Clark’s, about 40 or 50 yards from it.  
Last Sunday night week I went to bed about 10 o’clock, and after I had been in bed a little while, I heard
somebody in the road, and in consequence of that, I looked out of the window. I saw two men standing  
against the Pickerel pales, and then saw them go on to  the prosecutor’s premises. It was a bright
moonlight  night. When the men went into Clark’s premises I heard some fowls making a noise. I saw
the men come out of Clark’s premises, and one of these came past my  house. I don’t know who he was,
he appeared as if  he had a handkerchief on the ground and did something up in it. The next morning I
went to the spot, and  found a bunch of green onions with a single feather adhering to it. The two men
then joined company again and went towards the church, but came back and went his down Mr.
Bellward’s loke [lane]. I have seen the prisoner before, but I don’t know anything about him and have
never been in his company or spoken to him.
After I had seen this I went and called up Mr. Clark, it was about 12 o’clock. About four the next
morning, in consequence of what I was told, I went down to Bellward’s Quay and saw a boat, in which
two ducks were lying. At 12 o’clock, when I saw these men go on to Clark’s premises, another man was

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
the ducks came there. Fastened the boat Barrett was in, to his boat, and was rowing down the river  
when Barrett jumped out, and in doing so fell partially into the river. Fancied they were Clark’s ducks,  
and took them to him, and said, pointing to Barrett who was coming down the wall, “There goes the  
man now.”
 
 
 
 
 

lying in the road asleep. The man who passed my house was a tallish man, walked  with a rolling gait,
and was dressed in a dark Guernsey  or coat and light trousers.
Cross examination by Mr. Smith : I heard the clock  strike 12 when I was looking out of my window; I
live  just opposite Tyrrell’s; the man who was lying in the road did not appear to he sober.
Samuel Bellward remembered the morning of the 22nd July. Got up about 4 o’clock, when he missed
one of his boats. Saw it lying on the Suffolk side of the river near the bathing place. Went after it and
found a man named Barrett in it with two ducks. Barrett said he did not know how either himself or

Mr Smith said he apprehended the case against his client could not proceed, as the evidence pointed to
another man in whose possession the ducks were found, as being the perpetrator of the robbery.
The Chairman said certainly no evidence had at present been given connecting the prisoner with the
robbery, but the case must go on.
By Mr Smith: The ducks had been killed by having their necks wrung.

st

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PC William Peak said: I remember 21
saw the prisoner in various parts of the town in company with two other men. In consequence of
information received, I went to Clark’s house, and afterwards to prisoner’s. When I went into prisoner’s
house I  noticed his hands were stained with blood, and they looked as if the blood had been pressed
between his fingers, and I picked off his hand a small duck’s feather.
Prisoner was asked to account for this feather and the blood, and he made no reply. I produce the
garments prisoner wore that night – a dark coat and light trousers: they are marked with blood, and a
feather is still adhering to the trousers. On the way to the station, prisoner said, “Is Barrett locked up?” I
had not said  a word about Barrett. The feathers produced were taken from prisoner’s clothing.
Police-constable Balaam spoke to going to prisoner’s house. He found the feather produced just inside
the house, and squeezed blood from it.
This was the case for the prosecution, and Mr Smith addressed the bench for the defence, contending
there was no evidence of identification as to the fowls being Clark’s property, or as to the prisoner being
one of the men who was seen to go on Clark’s premises.
The Bench did not consider there was sufficient evidence to warrant them in committing prisoner for
trial, and he was accordingly discharged. Barrett had not at present been apprehended.
DRUNKENNESS
George Pitchers was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Puddingmoor-street, Beccles, on the

 of July. I was on duty during the fore part of the evening, and
nd

 
 
 
 
1872 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

22
Defendant was the man spoken of in the previous case as being found lying asleep in the road, and the
evidence showed that when he was woke up he was very riotous.
Fined 4s and 6s costs, which he paid.
ALLEGED DUCK STEALING, 

 July.
Beccles Paper 6 Aug 

Robert Gosling, Beccles, labourer, was charged with having, on the 21st of July, stolen two live ducks,
the property of Robert Clark, of the Pickerel, Mr. Smith appeared for defendant.
The prosecutor, who gave his evidence in a somewhat incoherent manner, proved that he had ten ducks
safe when he went to bed at ten o’clock. He was called up about twelve by Noah Gray, [who lived at 11
Puddingmoor] and then missed five ducks, but the next morning he found two more in a neighbour’s
garden, and so had only lost three. About half-past five or six two ducks were brought to his house by
the police, which were his property. There was one old one – a black and white duck, and a young one
-a dark grey. The feathers produced were the feathers of the ducks. He valued them at 2s. 6d. 
By Mr. Smith : Never got drunk, hadn’t money enough ; the ducks’ feathers produced were his; always
went to bed about ten. Had been robbed every year he had lived in the Pickerel. Knew it was 12 o’clock,
as any one else would, when the clock struck. Didn’t hear the clock strike. Didn’t see these ducks after
seven o’clock the night they were stolen; he didn’t sit up half the night as to watch his ducks.
Noah Gray, of Puddingmoor, Beccles, labourer, said: My house is on the opposite side of the way, a
little higher up than Clark’s, about 40 or 50 yards from it.  
Last Sunday night week I went to bed about 10 o’clock, and after I had been in bed a little while, I heard
somebody in the road, and in consequence of that, I looked out of the window. I saw two men standing  
against the Pickerel pales, and then saw them go on to  the prosecutor’s premises. It was a bright
moonlight  night. When the men went into Clark’s premises I heard some fowls making a noise. I saw
the men come out of Clark’s premises, and one of these came past my  house. I don’t know who he was,
he appeared as if  he had a handkerchief on the ground and did something up in it. The next morning I
went to the spot, and  found a bunch of green onions with a single feather adhering to it. The two men

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
the ducks came there. Fastened the boat Barrett was in, to his boat, and was rowing down the river  
when Barrett jumped out, and in doing so fell partially into the river. Fancied they were Clark’s ducks,  
and took them to him, and said, pointing to Barrett who was coming down the wall, “There goes the  
man now.”
 
 
 
 
 

then joined company again and went towards the church, but came back and went his down Mr.
Bellward’s loke [lane]. I have seen the prisoner before, but I don’t know anything about him and have
never been in his company or spoken to him.
After I had seen this I went and called up Mr. Clark, it was about 12 o’clock. About four the next
morning, in consequence of what I was told, I went down to Bellward’s Quay and saw a boat, in which
two ducks were lying. At 12 o’clock, when I saw these men go on to Clark’s premises, another man was
lying in the road asleep. The man who passed my house was a tallish man, walked  with a rolling gait,
and was dressed in a dark Guernsey  or coat and light trousers.
Cross examination by Mr. Smith : I heard the clock  strike 12 when I was looking out of my window; I
live  just opposite Tyrrell’s; the man who was lying in the road did not appear to he sober.
Samuel Bellward remembered the morning of the 22nd July. Got up about 4 o’clock, when he missed
one of his boats. Saw it lying on the Suffolk side of the river near the bathing place. Went after it and
found a man named Barrett in it with two ducks. Barrett said he did not know how either himself or

Mr Smith said he apprehended the case against his client could not proceed, as the evidence pointed to
another man in whose possession the ducks were found, as being the perpetrator of the robbery.
The Chairman said certainly no evidence had at present been given connecting the prisoner with the
robbery, but the case must go on.
By Mr Smith: The ducks had been killed by having their necks wrung.

st

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PC William Peak said: I remember 21
saw the prisoner in various parts of the town in company with two other men. In consequence of
information received, I went to Clark’s house, and afterwards to prisoner’s. When I went into prisoner’s
house I  noticed his hands were stained with blood, and they looked as if the blood had been pressed
between his fingers, and I picked off his hand a small duck’s feather.
Prisoner was asked to account for this feather and the blood, and he made no reply. I produce the
garments prisoner wore that night – a dark coat and light trousers: they are marked with blood, and a
feather is still adhering to the trousers. On the way to the station, prisoner said, “Is Barrett locked up?” I
had not said  a word about Barrett. The feathers produced were taken from prisoner’s clothing.
Police-constable Balaam spoke to going to prisoner’s house. He found the feather produced just inside
the house, and squeezed blood from it.
This was the case for the prosecution, and Mr Smith addressed the bench for the defence, contending
there was no evidence of identification as to the fowls being Clark’s property, or as to the prisoner being
one of the men who was seen to go on Clark’s premises.
The Bench did not consider there was sufficient evidence to warrant them in committing prisoner for
trial, and he was accordingly discharged. Barrett had not at present been apprehended.
DRUNKENNESS
George Pitchers was charged with being drunk and disorderly in Puddingmoor-street, Beccles, on the

 of July. I was on duty during the fore part of the evening, and
nd

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

22
Defendant was the man spoken of in the previous case as being found lying asleep in the road, and the
evidence showed that when he was woke up he was very riotous.
Fined 4s and 6s costs, which he paid.

 July.
1873 
Beccles Paper 7 Oct 
DESTRUCTIVE FIRE

NO little alarm was caused in Beccles on Tuesday morning last by the solemn sound of the fire-bells,
 
 
 
 
 
present, giving directions and personally doing all in their power to get the flames under.
Notwithstanding that there was abundance of help and that plenty of water was available from the river,  
it soon became evident that all attempts to save the warehouse (a weather-boarded and asphalt-roofed  
building, containing articles of almost every possible description), in which the fire originated, would be  
worse than useless. Accordingly, the efforts of the firemen and those who were present were directed to  
saving the dwelling-house of Mr. Tyrrell with the shop adjoining, together with their contents. In an in 
credibly short space of time these buildings were emptied of their contents, one of the fire-engines
meanwhile playing upon them to keep them cool, whilst the warehouse, in which the fire first broke out,  

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Mayor
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

which were heard pealing forth from the church tower. On inquiry, it was found that a fire had broken
out in the warehouse of Mr. Jeremiah Tyrrell, Pudding-moor, who is well known as a general furniture
dealer and broker. In as short a time as possible the fire engines were on the spot, as were also the
police,  under  the  command  of  Superintendent  Gobbett  and  Inspector  Cole,  and  besides  these, the
(T. A. Laws, Esq.). the Town Surveyor (Mr. G. Fenn), and other of the borough officials were also

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
end, and  
but Mr
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

was left to its fate, and was quickly being consumed. The rapidity with which the flames spread was  
something unprecedented, and notwithstanding the most strenuous efforts, it was found impossible to  
prevent the flames spreading to the shop, and dwelling-house, all the woodwork of which was  
consumed, merely the roofs and walls being left standing. fortunately, however, the flames were
prevented spreading beyond the property of Mr. Tyrrell, although the adjoining property was very much
damaged by the quantity of water that was obliged to be plentifully bestowed upon them. In a little more  
than an hour from the time of the commencement of the fire, the flames were well under control, and all  
danger of their spreading further was at an end, but it was of course necessary to keep the engines  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

playing upon the debris
Although the damage sustained is very considerable, it is nothing to what might have been the case.
From what has since transpired, it seems that in a box beneath the shop, to which we have said the
flames extended, and all the woodwork of which was burnt, were stored no less than 200 cartridges, and
had these exploded (and it is marvellous they did not, as they were in close proximity to the flames), the
results must have been most disastrous, probably both to life and property. Providentially, no such
 
 
Tyrell is insured to the extent of 510. The total value of the premises and stock consumed is estimated
at upwards of 1,159.
We cannot conclude our report without a word of praise to all those who were present for the energetic
manner in which they endeavoured to get the command of the flames, and for their praiseworthy efforts

for some time longer.

serious catastrophe occurred, and by 11 o’clock all further need of the fire engines was at an
shortly after the premises were left in charge of the police. The cause of the fire is unknown,

 
 
 
 

in saving the property in danger. [The property destroyed was number 40 Puddingmoor]
COUNCIL: JL Kent storing petrol in various places; in the shop, in  a warehouse behind the shop, in
licensed store in Ballygate, under the wall near the street by his house in Ballygate, in a loke in  
Puddingmoor. Kent only allowed to store 3 gallons behind his shop.
POLICE COURT: Information against Jane Davy, the occupier of an overcrowded house in  
Puddingmoor, known as the “Hole in the Wall”. The house has only two rooms, one a wash house
and the other the living room. The living room is about six yards square, the other room is about
three. In each there is a bed. There are no upper rooms. Seven people sleep in the house, viz:  
defendant & her brother-in-law, a boy aged 16 years of age, one about 10, another about 7, a little
girl a year and a half old, and a baby.
Mr AG Love, Inspector of Nuisances, said he had served notices on defendant, who had repeatedly
promised to get out some of the children, but she had not done so.
Defendant said that the oldest boy was going to sleep out after this. Her children enjoyed excellent
 
 
The Bench made an order that only one adult and four children under the age of 16 should sleep in
the  house.

 
1876 
 
 
1878 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
to  
 
 

 
 
Beccles Paper, 4 Jan 

 
 

 
 

Beccles Paper 30 Jul 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

health while living there. One boy particularly weak before, was now quite jolly. It was her wish
get another house, but she could not get one.

 
 
 
[The situation still looked the same in 1881  according to the Census:

 
 

 
 

Pudding Moor Stepping Hill, Beccles, Suffolk, England
Jane DAVEY 

Census 1881

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Robert DAVEY 
John DAVEY 
Walter DAVEY 
Herbert DAVEY 
Maria J. DAVEY 
Elias DAVEY 
This house was owned by Harriet Meen. It was the third house down from the top of Stepping Hill leading into

38  
20  
13  
10  
3  
2  
36  

Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 

Head 
Son 
Son 
Son 
Son 
Daur 
Brother In Law 

 
 
 
 
 

Bricklayers Widow
General Labourer
General Labourer
Scholar
Scholar

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 

 

General Labourer

Ballygate.]
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Marriage of Jane Spall to Robert Davey
1860 
 
Groom’s Father  
Bride’s.Father   
by J. Talbot Johnston [Rector]
he signed x 

Parish Register

 
 
 
 
 
 

May 14
 

ROBERT DAVEY
JANE SPALL  
DAVID DAVEY
ROBERT SPALL

full age
19 years
 
 

bachelor  
spinster,  
 
 

bricklayer 
servant
lime burner
tailor

of this parish &
of this parish by banns

 

 
 

Witnesses 
 

 
 

Henry Aldous
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

she signed  
BAPTISM of Children:
1861 
1862  
1876  
1873 

 
Eliza Spall X
Parish Register

 
 
 
 

May 31
May 31
Feb 19
Mar 25

ROBERT son of
DAVID son of 
EDWARD JAMES son of  
ANNIE FRANCES daughter of  

 
 

Robert and Jane DAVEY bn Dec 9 1861
Robert and Jane DAVEY bn Aug 5 1862
Robert & Jane DAVEY 

Limeburner
Limeburner
Labourer

 
Robert & Jane DAVEY bn Jan 7 1873

Bricklayer

1878 
 
 

Beccles Paper 24 Sep 

SALE: Puddingmoor: Five Substantial Cottages in Puddingmoor abutting on properties of Mr Crisp
& Mr George Tyrell  with good gardens, containing nearly one rod, occupied by Brady,  Reynolds,
Peck, Tyrell & Gardener, quarterly Tenants. Rentals 17 2s

 
 

 
 

1878 
 
 

Beccles Paper 19 Nov 

SALE: property of Mrs Rachel Lark, deceased, in Puddingmoor: Three capital Brick & Tiled  
Cottages, a large Garden well planted with fruit bushes & trees. Frontage on Puddingmoor of 90ft,
nearly 1 acre. Rental 30 pa. Free Rent to Manor Of Barsham Hall 1 Coomb of Barley.
[W Woolner 320]

 
 

 
 

 
1878 
 
 
 

 
 
Beccles Paper 26 Nov 

SALE, 5 December 1878 at King’s Head: Residence of Richard Bohun, Esq.
LOT 5
A Double Cottage and Garden Ground with a site for an additional Cottage, situate in Puddingmoor
Street, let to Noah Grey and Mary Carter at 8 pa.
[Mr Culham 175]

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
1879 
 
 
1879 
 
 

 
 
Beccles Paper, 14 Jan 

THEFT: Selina Palmer charged with stealing china basin from Red’s sale at Mrs Hamby house.
John Goffin his assistant saw it in sale and missed it. To Mr Tyrell, broker & dealer [in  
Puddingmoor]. He had bought it for 9d. Girl not positively identified. Released.

 
 

 
 

 
Beccles Paper, 25 Feb 

SALE: Puddingmoor: Freehold double Cottage with valuable Building Land at junction of
Puddingmoor and the path leading to Ballygate in occupation of John Lockwood 7 James Gray. The  
land, now cultivated as Gardens, contains (with the site of the buildings) 28 rods, has a frontage of  

 

 
 

135ft & well adapted for the erection of several cottages. [Mr AE Hockey 195]

 
1880 
 
1912 August 
Lane, Thurlow’s Yard and Puddingmoor. There was a loss too at industrial undertakings. The timber yards and saw mills of Darby
Bros. just on the Gillingham side of Beccles Bridge, were completely submerged. On the Beccles bank the tannery at Northgate was
badly hit. Work was suspended for almost a week through the yards being inundated, the pits flooded and the water level reaching
the fire bars of the engine.
Next morning a photographer, Mr A. Leyneek, of Station Road, happened to see the animals floundering about while he was gazing
at the flooded marshes from the churchyard wall. Braving the danger caused by wind and swiftly flowing water, he borrowed a
rowing boat and set out towards the animals in the hope that he could attract them to safety. After a great deal of patient effort he
got  them to swim towards the town side of the river. Eventually they were hauled ashore by a band of willing helpers at the
Puddingmoor boatyard of Mr Herbert Hipperson.

 
Beccles Paper 27 Apr 

COUNCIL: (1) Bathing Place let to Mr W Smith at 20pa for 5 years; Mr RA King & Mr Tyrell  
 
House flooding was particularly serious in the vicinity of the river. Many properties suffered at Bridge Street, Fen

 
required to remove obstructions in Puddingmoor

1914 
 
1914 
 
 
 
 

ATTEMPTED SUICIDE by Mrs Larke of 13 Puddingmoor. Jumped into river, saved from
drowning  by young man beside river.

 
Beccles Paper 3 Feb 
 
Beccles Paper 29 Sep 

SPECIAL CONSTABLES: ex-Policemen, ex soldiers, & others accustomed to discipline: In cases of
emergency: 1) Raids or invasion, to maintain order and guard communications. 2) Consequences of  
war: internal disorder due to unemployment, reduced food supplies, etc. 3) Industrial disputes.  
numbers at present: 3,616. Will be provided with appointment card, a badge, a whistle and a staff.
Divisional Officer: JP Larkman; Sub Division: Major SL Barrett (Telport, Puddingmoor)

 
 
 
 

 
 

SALTGATE
DEATHS IN PLAGUE YEAR

PRYNT Mary d of William & Elizabeth 
FASSETT Alice d of Robert & Alice 
FASSETT Elizabeth d of Robert & Alice 

 
 

11 October 
31 December
6 November

1597 
1597 
1597 

487  
524
504
 
505 

Saltgate 01 [Matthew Prynt heirs] ? ? 
Saltgate 03 [Robert Fawcet]
Saltgate 03 [Robert Fawcet]

 
 

FASSETT Mary d of Robert & Alice 
1597 
7 November
Saltgate 03 [Robert Fawcet]
SALTGATE 
Plan XVI

425 
412 
417 
419 
418 
424 
416 

45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 

tenant now 
1st Part
formerly
tenant 
now 
now 
now 

1728 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 

Sal 
Clarke, John & Eliz  
Clarke, John Joseph
Perett, Daniel 
Purvis, Geoffrey 
Purvis, Geoffrey 
Schuldham, Abraham 

Brett, Daniel 

 
linen weaver 
 
 
 
 
 

 
east/part

Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB

1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 

property
south/part 
north/part. 
north/part 
east/part
 

 
 
 
 

Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB
south/part 

Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB

426 
413 
414 
427 
423 
415 
457 
459 

45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
45 
47.2 
47.2 

 
2nd Part
now 
now 
now 
formerly
1st Part
now 

1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 

Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 

Schuldham, Abraham 
Schuldham, John
Schuldham, John 
Street: Puddingmoor 
Street: Saltgate 
Wakefield, Rebecca
Purvis, Geoffrey
Purvis, Geoffrey 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
property
south/part 
west/part
east/part
south/part 
property
east

west/part
Plan XVIB

gent 
 

Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB

 
 
 
 

Plan XVIB

460 
458 
461 
462 
480 
482 
481 
694 

47.2 
47.2 
47.2 
47.2 
49 
49 
49 
66 

now 
2nd Part
now 
now 
formerly
now 
formerly
occ now

1728 
1728 
1728 
1728 
1758 
1758 
1758 
1816 

Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 
Sal 

Schuldham, Abraham 
Schuldham, John
Schuldham, John 
Street: lane Pud to Saltgate
Clarke, Joseph 
Schuldham, Abraham 
Wase, William 
Pymar, Mr 

 
 
 

 
property
south

west

 
 

 

 
 
 
 

west
 
west
 

west

 
 

property
Plan XVIB

 
1 house

411 
485 
484 
473 
483 
474 
486 
701 

45 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
49 
67 

1st Part
form tenant 
form tenant 
Deed 
form tenant 
Purchaser
form tenant 
now 

1728 

Sal  
1758 
1758 
Sal 01 
1758 
Sal 01 
1758 
Sal 01 

Purvis, Geoffrey
Sal 01 
Sal 01 
Holden, Edw/Barsham 
Sal 01 
Leeder, Jesse 
Sal 01 
Crowfoot, Dr 

 
Davy, Charles 
Hobart, John 

yeoman
clerk 
 
clerk 
 
surgeon
 
 

property
propertry
propertry
property
propertry
property
propertry
south

1758 
Howard, Nathaniel
1758 

 
Leeder, Jesse 

1817 
1816 

 
 

742 
743 
704 
703 
698 
699 
700 
818 

69 
69 
67 
67 
67 
67 
67 
73.2 

now 
lately 
occ now
occ now
Sale by
Sale to

Street 
Legal 1

Sal 02 
Sal 02 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 

Creed, John 
Maskill, Boyce 
Folkard, Mr 
Pymar, Mr 
Schuldham, Wm London
Schuldham, Wm Marlsfd

Street: Saltgate 
Harmer, Sam 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

west
west
property
 
property
property
property
property

1816 
1817 
1817 
1817 
1817 
1817 
1824 

 
 
 

property
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
sale

messe/yards
messe/yards
messe/yards

 
 

819 
820 
822 
821 
476 
478 
477 
702 

73.2 
73.2 
73.2 
73.2 
49 
49 
49 
67 

Legal 1
Legal 2

occ 
occ 
formerly
now 
formerly
now 

1824 
1824 
1824 
1824 
1758 
1758 
1758 
1817 

Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05 
Sal 05?
Sal 05?
Sal 05?
Sal 09 

Harmer, Susanna wife 
Harris, William
Jarman, Robert 
Pymar, Thomas 
Purvis, Geoffrey 
Schuldham, Abraham 
Schuldham, John 
The George 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

property
property
property
property
north
 
north
north

 
 
 
 

sale
sale
sale
sale

 
 
 
 

north

 
 

422 
420 
421 

45 
45 
45 

now 
formerly
formerly

1728 
1728 
1728 

Sal 11 
Sal 9 ? 
Sal 9? 

Purvis, Thomas 
Wake, Robert 
Mason, Henry 

 
 
 

 
 
 

north 
north/part 
north/part 

Plan XVIB

Plan XVIB
Plan XVIB

1728 
 
 
 
 
 

Deeds 45 

 
 
 
 
 
 

INDENTURE, 4 February, between Geoffrey Purvis (yeoman) AND John Clarke (linen weaver) &
Elizabeth his wife, daughter of Geoffrey Purvis of ONE PART
John Schuldham, (gent) of the OTHER PART
ALL THAT Messuage
BETWEEN the Messuage of John Schuldham, [Saltgate 1, & 3] formerly of Rebecca Wakefield  
in part AND the Messuage of Abraham Schuldham (gent), formerly of John Joseph Clarke SOUTH

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1728 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1758 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
houses, barns & yards of Geoffrey Purvis on the NORTH
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Another Messuage of Geoffrey Purvis [Saltgate 11] now in the occupation of Daniel Perret in part
AND Messuage now or late of Robert Wake, [Saltgate 9] before that Henry Mann in part AND the

Abutting on Saltgate AND on the Messuage of Geoffrey Purvis now in the occupation of Daniel
Brett to the EAST
The Messuage of  Abraham Schuldham in part AND upon Puddingmoor to the WEST
Now in the occupation of Geoffrey Purvis & -- Gibbs (widow) - for one year.
INDENTURE, 4 May, between Geoffrey Purvis of ONE PART
John Schuldham the OTHER PART
ALL THAT House or outhouse called the Barkhouse appertaining to the Messuage where Geoffrey
Purvis lives, together with a yard adjoining on the WEST side thereof
BETWEEN another yard of Geoffrey Purvis lying next to his House on the EAST
The tenement of Abraham Schuldham on the WEST
Abutting on the Messuage, outhouses & stable of John Schuldham AND the yards grounds ways or
passage there leading from Puddingmoor to the NORTH
INDENTURE, 9 October, between Rev Edward Holden of Barsham of ONE PART
Jesse Leeder (gent) of Beccles (surgeon) of the OTHER PART
ALL THAT Messuage formerly called the Greyhound or Dog & house, outhouses, stable, yards,
gardens
BETWEEN the Churchyard on the SOUTH
The Messuage formerly of Geoffrey Purvis, late of John Schuldham & now of Abraham Schuldham
on the NORTH
Saltgate to the EAST
The Messuage formerly of Joseph Clarke, late of William Wase & now of Abraham Schuldham to
the WEST
Formerly in the tenure of Nathaniel Howard & John Hobart, late of Rev Charles Davy & Jesse  
Leeder & now in the sole use of Jesse Leeder and A piece of yard formerly of Geoffrey Purvis, late
of John Schuldham, now of Abraham Schuldham on the EAST side of the Stable.
For one year.

Deeds 47B

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Deeds 49 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SALTGATE 5 & 7

1816 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1817 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Deeds 66 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

AGREEMENT: William Schuldham of Lion Street, Kent Road, London of ONE PART
& Wiliam Abraham Schuldham of Marlesford, Suffolk, barrister, acting for William Schuldham of
Marlesford SECOND PART
in consideration of 2,500 paid by William Schuldham of Marlesford unto William Schuldham of
London, conveys ALL ESTATE as Cousin & heir of Frances Schuldham, late of Beccles, ALL  
MESSUAGES, LANDS, etc of which Frances Schuldham died EXCEPT three Messuages or  
tenements in Beccles in the tenures of Mr Pymar, Mr Cross & Mrs Berry & Mrs Groom.
INDENTURE between William Schuldham of London & William Schuldham of Marlesford of ONE

 
 
 
 
 
 

Deeds 67, Jan 24 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

PART
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

& William Schuldham of Stanley Road the SECOND PART
ALL THAT messuage
BETWEEN the House of Dr Crowfoot, surgeon on the NORTH [Saltgate 1 & 3]
& the Public House called the George on the SOUTH [Saltgate 9]
WITH the Yards, Gardens, Stable & Stay Chamber over the same, now in the several occupations of
Mr Pymar [the organist of St Michael’s], Mr Folkard
[also houses in Smallgate & Newgate]

BECCLES MANOR 1852

59 
42 
60 

Crowfoot, William J 
Bean, Francis 
Crowfoot, William J 

0.03 
0.02 
1.04 

Crowfoot
Hall 
 



 
 
 

Sal 
Sal 
Sal 

 
 
house adjoining 

 
 

Sal 01
Sal 02 
Sal 03

 
2shillings

43 
11 

Bean, Francis 
Bardwell, Mrs Bond

 
 

1.02 
1.02 

 
 


 
 

 
 

adjoining
 

 
 

Sal 04
Sal 11

75 
business
200 
144 
Pickerel
201 
 
157 

28/04/1857 
Advert
Ross, John 
 
Sal 
 
Baker & Confectioner 
(late Shreeve) taking over

15/12/1857 
18/08/1857 

Advert
Law 

Lilly, RW 
Lark, Robert 

Sal 
Pud 

 
 

Photographs 
false accusation 

on glass or paper.
publicly denies being informer against the

15/12/1857 
 
22/09/1857 

News 
 
NewsCouncl 

Rix, SW
 

 
 
Rix, SW

Sal 
 
Sal 

 
 
 

Wangford Union elected 
Angell (10) & Lenny (8)
canvass for Town Clerk 

Rix as Clerk(25). Other candidates
 
Support from 250 people listed in

paper
165 
Knowles, Scott, Cowles

06/10/1857 
NewsCouncl 
Rix, SW
Sal 
 
Town Clerk, not elected 
Support: J Crisp, Carpenter, Ward,

1872 
 
 
 
1875 
 
 
 
1876 
 
 
1879 
 
 
 
 
1880 
 
 
 
1914 
 
 
 
 
1914 
 
1914 
1914 

Beccles Paper 28 Apr 

SUICIDE: by hanging of Mrs Peck, aged 64, wife of Samuel Peck, beer house keeper, Saltgate.  
Unsettled since the suicide of Talbot Johnson [the Rector, who lived nearby] had religious mania -
thought she had taken the Sacrament unworthily. Hanged herself in the cellar. [listed in Puddingmoor in
1871 (number 313)]
SALE: A good freehold Family Residence in Saltgate occupied by William Cutting: Entrance Hall,
Dining & Drawing Rooms, back Sitting Room, Cellar, WC & six good sleeping Rooms. Water &  
Gas are laid on.. A two stalled Stable & Coach House, with loft over and a large Workshop 30ft x
30ft.
TO LET: Good Business Premises, with 10 Roomed Residence in Saltgate, with Yard, Stabling,  
Coach House & Workshops suitable for a Wheelwright, Cabinet Maker or Builder. Apply Charles
Drake, Land Agent
PHRENOLOGY. 4 Lectures by Professor Cohen. Chair man the Rector. The lectures will be  
illustrated by a life-size portrait gallery; and several heads chosen by the audience will be
phrenologically examined.. Professor Cohen gives Private Consultations at his rooms, Saltgate, when
he will advise as to the management of health, improvement of mind and body, and give complete
phrenological examinations
COUNCIL: SANITARY COMMITTEE: 1) Mr Strathern at the Angel to connect with water  
company  2) two grates in passage by Welch’s house be removed and cess-pools filled up. 3) A
gutter to be laid both sides of Saltgate with stones from the Common  4) The lamp on the Black Boy
Inn be removed and placed on a column on the premises occupied by Mr E Spratt.
CINEMA  IN  SALTGATE:  During  construction  bones found near the Puddingmoor end. The house
pulled down to make way for the cinema had been occupied by the Stimpson family (church  
Bellringers) for several generations, next door was the Prince of Wales Inn, which long ago  
disappeared, the site forming the garden of premises occupied by SW Rix. 5 Skulls unearthed &  
other bones.
COUNCIL: Plan for a new Cinematographic building in Saltgate by Eastern Counties Cinema Co  
diapproved by Committee.
MUSIC LIENCE: newly erected Cinema Palace in Saltgate given licence forpublic singing & dancing
COUNCIL: Plans approved for 1) Engine House at the back of the Picture Palace in Saltgate.

 
 
 

 
 
 

Beccles Paper 21 Sep 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Beccles Paper, 15 Feb 

 
 

 
 

Beccles Paper, 2 Sep 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
Beccles Paper 24 Aug 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Beccles Paper 17 Feb 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Beccles Paper 13 Jan 
 
 
Beccles Paper 5 May 
Beccles Paper 4 Aug 
Cinema

LINGERING in Saltgate the other day a friend choose to upbraid me for having neglected to include the Cinema in my sketches of
the town, adding sontowhat despairingly: You of all people should have a tale to tell.” So, in deference to my friend the omission
shall be remedied. 
The story of the Cinema, in Saltgate, is too recent to be termed history. Built in 1914 on the site of the old Prince of Wales Inn, its
opening was attended with little ceremony..for it was around the time of the commencement of the first World War.
It was owned by a Norwich company and my only recollection is of its resident pianist, a little fellow with hair brushed well back,
his coat tails arrayed behind the piano stool as he performed. The war lingered on with its memories of Zeppelin nights when on
occasion the hostile airships clanked across the skies carrying their load of bombs weighing but a few pounds each.
THE SERIALS
Yet all was well within the Cinema, The silver screen poirtrayed the latest productions, not forgetling the great attraction of the
serial, which in those days counted more than even the feature film. The never-to-be-forgotten Pearl White, the thrills, even the sob
stuff as we sang the theme tune “Elaine” in which we indicated the Lady had set our hearts aflame!
After the war the ownership of the Cinema changed and eventually passed into local hands and it embarked upon an era probably
unequalled since, with genial Bob Atkinson as manager and Mr. Jimmy Cutler the musical chief. In the early days tinkling piano was
considered adequate to lend atmosphere to a picture but later a small three or four piece orchestra took its place, for the musical
accompaniment to a picture was slowly becoming an art.
With the coming of “super” pictures a musical score was generally available, adding considerably to the presentation, while sound
effects emanating from the orchestra pit provided a touch of realism.
EFFECTS USED
An example of this considerably added to the success of D. W. Griffith’s “Way Down East” which ran at the Cinema for a week.
The  music  was  superb—even  now  I  seldom  hear  Schubert’s  Serenade  without  harking  back to this picture, for the heroin’s
appearance (Lillian Gish played the part) at any time in the picture produced a few bars of this theme, while her escape across the
ice-floes released a shattering roar from a cylinder containing stones etc. in the orchestra pit.
Sleigh bells, triangles, tambourines and rain effects were also added as required. There were many other special screenings in the
old  Cinema  days—how  well  I  remember  other  Griffith’s  “supers”  “Broken  Blossoms”  (also  with  Lilian  Gish)  and the mighty
“Intolerance” and “Birth of a Nation.” The great Valentino in “The Four Horsemen” and Lon Chaney m “The Hunchback of Notre

Dame” and others ‘that appeared on the Cinema screen.
BRITISH FILMS
All the foregoing pictures, together with most of the stars had origin in the US A. but what of the British films of the Cinema’s silent
days? Truth to tell they are in the main forgotten, for the British film industry of those days was but in its birth pangs. The best of a
poor lot were undoubtedly those that emerged from the Hepworth studios, their stars being Henry Edwards, Chrissie White and
Stewart Rome.
True the Hepworth artists gave sincere nerformances and the scenes of the countryside of Old England were as a breath of fresh,
sweet  air  compared with the interminable scenes of the American canyons, and dusty prairies with their bandits and sheriff’s
posses! Drama, comedy—with tears and laughter, great pictures, poor pictures—even an unusual picture, “Warning Shadows”
which was shown for but one night—all these contributed to the good old days of the silent films; two houses nightly, with
Saturday and Bank Holiday matinees.
There were the regular Cinemagoers—you could tell the evening without a calendar by a glance at some of the rows of seats—if
you saw ‘old - “ in his favourite seat it was Monday, observe Mrs. -- and it would certainly be Wednesday.
FIRST TALKIE
There came a day when the sound picture appeared on the horizon, but the Cinema was in no hurry to adopt the “talkies.” True in
the  early  1930’s  the  orchestra  pit underwent altereations, the orchestra—almost like the Arabs— stole silently away, and the
Cinema was bereft of Jimmie’s fiddle, Gus’s cornet to say nothing of cello and piano, their place being taken by a radiogram and
recorded music.
The Cinema eventually succumbed to the new cult and its first “all talking” feature was “The Love Parade” wiith Maurice Chevalier,
though by this time it had a “sister” theatre, the Regal, firmly established in Ballygate.
Yet it is at the “Old Cinema” that my happiest memories remain, for even as a relief pianist it was a privilege indeed to share the
comradeship of men and women whose duty it was to provide the public with its entertainment. Alas! some of them are no longer
with us, yet, among an older race of cinema-goer I cannot think the memory of them will fade.

Eugene Ulph.  July 1950
THE WALK

1739/01/13 
1739/09/15 
1758/12/02 
1758/12/02 

Maillard, Dan 

gunmaker
Property/shop/sale
grocer
joiner

Property/shop/house 

 
property
property
property

property
 
 
 

 
Walk
Walk 06
Walk 06

Walk 
next Angel
 
 

 
Property/let 
Property/agent Morse's 

 
 

Morse, Jn late oc
Wright, Chas 

1759/03/31 
1760/11/15 
1761/04/04 
1763/11/27 
1763/11/27 
1763/11/27 
1767/10/17 
1767/10/17 

Morse, Jn
Coe, Isaac 
Coe, Isaac 
Baxter, Thos 
Leman & Rede 
 
Le Grys, Robt d.
Le Grys, Robt d.

 

grocer
 
 
peruke maker
attorney
Inn/AngelProperty/sale Inn
surgeon
surgeon

Property/sale/let 
draper
draper

 
Property/take Morse shop
details of stock 

property

 
property
trade
 
property
 
 
 

Walk 06
 

Walk 06

 
property
 
property
property
property

Property/Angel/agent
Property/Angel/agent 

Walk 03
 
Walk 03
Walk 03
Walk 02.1

Walk 03
 

 
Property/Ho/Denny Mrs oc
Property/Ho/Parsons J oc 

1768/11/12 
1769/11/04 
1774/04/23 

Wright, Chas d. 
Allcock, Jn jun 
Algar, Jas

Property/shop/house 
Property/Newton's shop 

joiner
saddler
Inn/White Lion

 
property
property

property
 
 

 
Walk 06
Walk 03

Rook
 
moves to Angel site

14 
163 

Carr, J & Son 
Syder, George 

 

Walk
Walk

 
Sale 

Boot & Shoe maker
Stock of furniture; easy chairs, mahogany dining chairs

successors to PC Benns

02/02/1857Advert
06/10/1857Advert

 

1876 
 

Beccles Paper, 18 Apr 

COUNCIL:
6. The Walk to be repaired with Flag Stones.

 
 

174 
1 
92 
89 

Mason, Thomas 
Armitage, Mrs 
Dashwood, Charles
Dashwood, Charles

1.02 
0.055 
0.055 
0.1 

f 
f 
f 
f 

 
 

 
 
Allcock 

Walk  02
Walk  02.1
Walk  03
Walk  04

 

 
 

 

 
 

Miller 
Amyas

NMar 
NMar 

house