Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
BRIDGE STREET
UNIDENTIFIED

1802
 

SALE: Freehold Estate, Bridge Street, Beccles: Edmund Skipper.
Substantial Dwelling House, Cottage in the Yard in three dwellings, back house, Granary, Slaughter
House,  Stable  for  six  horses, hog styes & all other necessary outbuildings for a Butcher in large
business.
SALE by George Crowe at the Angel Inn: Freehold Cottages in Bridge Street: [Poor Rate 9-13]
All let to tenants from year to year. The Valuation of occupied Cottages in 1824 was 4-4s
LOT 1: Brick & Tiled Cottage, small Yard & wash house occupied by Mary Boreham 
LOT 2: Brick & Tiled Cottage, small Yard & wash house occupied by Thomas Galer
LOT 3: Brick & Tiled Cottage, small Yard & wash house occupied by Robert Turrell
LOT 4: Brick & Tiled Cottage, small Yard & wash house occupied by William Greenacre
LOT 5: Brick & Tiled Cottage, large Yard & quay leading to the River, well situated for a coal yard,
now untenanted
Particulars from the Auctioneer or Mr Crowe, the Post Office.
SALE of TREES: Auction Sale, Beccles. To be Sold by R Oswald the entire Stock of Fruit & Forest
Trees, evergreens & flowering shrubs of HW Gill, Nurseryman near the Bridge. c 400,000 finest trees.
Most Trees including ash, alder, beech, birch, horse & Spanish chestnut, elms, firs, poplars, hazels,
holly, hornbeams, limes and  oaks, sycamore; 10,000 Evergreens & flowering Shrubs. Variety of Roses.
TURNPIKE ROAD from Little Yarmouth to Blythburgh: AGM of Trustees in King’s Head, Beccles on
Monday 18 March at 12 o’clock “taking into consideration of erecting a new Bridge across part of the
Road called Gillingham Dam at or near the present wooden Footbridge”.
FATAL ACCIDENT: On Friday Morning as “Hope” the Yarmouth COACH on its way to Bury on
entering Beccles the Leader shyed at the Town near the Bridge, where the Pavement commences. The
off  wheel  runs  against a wall, the Coach overturns, woman killed. Several of Jury wish to protest
against driving unicorn teams - unsafe. Coroner: Can’t do it.
RESCUED: As a Party of Ladies & Gents coming up the River intending to land near the Bridge after
an afternoon’s excursion, one of the party, Miss Everett of Corton injudiciously leaned over the Boat
and fell in. No assistance was near, all hope of saving her life was lost until Mr Garnham (although no
swimmer) sprang into the stream & succeeded in landing her on a barge.... she recovered.
RAILWAY LINES: Meeting at Public Hall, Beccles on possible Railway Lines. Capt Moorsom & Mr
Bedder  ... latter proposes line crossing Bridge Street [Northgate] & across Playground of Mr Cowles
Academy “near which spot the Station will be erected.”
BUSINESS: Sam Haward’s Business as Stone, Brick & Tile Merchant taken by Sam Stearn in Bridge
Street
CHOLERA: MEETING 7 September: Paving Committee to put down Stench Traps in Bridge Street near
John Fisher’s.  Thomas Wright to empty privy premises in Northgate.
ADVERTISEMENT: James Marshall, Dyer & Scourer, Bridge Street: Moreens dyed to various colours,
& watered. Chintz furniture cleaned & glazed. Ladies’ dresses, shawls & scarfs cleaned.
SALE: Furniture of Mr C Leighton (who declines housekeeping) near the Bridge.

Norwich Paper 27 Mar 
 

1824
 
 
 
 
 
 

Ipswich Journal 17 Jul 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
1834

 
Norwich Mercury 4 Jan  
1839 
Ipswich Journal 16 Mar 
1840
Bury Post 21 Jul 
1843 
Norwich Mercury 26 Aug
1845 
Norfolk Mercury 25 Jan 
1848 
Norfolk Mercury 15 Jan 
1849 
Beccles Nuisance Ctte 
1858
Beccles Paper 20 Apr 
1862
Beccles Paper 21 Oct 
PLANNING PERMISSSION

8 Oct 
2 Dec
31 Oct
8 May
16 May
17 Jun

Bridge 
Bridge 
Bridge Street 
Bridge Street 
Bridge Street 
Bridge Street 

 
 

1884
1884
1905
1906
1911
1913

Old Bridge: Chairman to purchase rubble if desired.
Old Bridge: 29 Loads of stone purchased at 1s per load

Planning
Planning
Planning
Planning
Planning
Planning

 

Edgar Osborne, Maltster's Arms registered cow keeper
Alterations to the Ship Inn, Bridge Street
Alterations to old Mission Room in Bridge Street
Telephone poles from boundary, Bridge Street, Ravensmere, Station Rd

approved 
approved 

 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
THE GREAT BRIDGE OF BECCLES
1388
 

EARLIEST WILL of the 110 wills to mention the Bridge is that of the Rector, Edmund de Wellis in
1388. who left 6s 8d for the bridge. In 1437 John Monk left 1 shilling for the foundations of the bridge
and the same year Edmund Candeler left 6s 8d for the bridge and causeway and then six years later
money was left for “making the bridge,”. In 1455 the hermit at the bridge makes his appearance when
he is named as the executor of a will and then in 1462:
“to William Ward, hermit of Beccles, to dispose on the reparation of Beccles Bridge.”
The following year 1463 we get a little more information from a will:
“to William Ward, the hermit of Beccles, to dispose about the reparation of the chapel of the Blessed
Mary at the Great Bridge of Beccles and on the reparation of the Bridge.”
He must have been well thought of for he appears in a number of wills by name.
A slightly more ambiguous entry is made 20 years later when 4d is left to the hermit of Beccles, but no
name is given, and the same will leaves 6d for the reparation of the Great Bridge.
No other Beccles hermit is mentioned. It is after all an acquired taste becoming a hermit.
Celia  Finnes  mentioned  the  difficulties  of  crossing  the  bridge  in times of flood when she visited
Beccles in 1697. The Chapel would have been destroyed by that time as the result of Reformation
activities.
“At the town’s end one passes over the River Waveney on a wooden bridge railed with timber and so
you enter Norfolk, it is a low flat ground all here about so that the least rains they are overflowed by
the River and lie under water, as they did when I was there, so that the road lay under water, which

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

is very unsafe for strangers to pass, by reason of the holes and quicksands and loose bottom.” [It is
unlikely that it was a wooden bridge at this time, but the approach might have been wooden.]
So that is what she thought of Beccles in winter.
MANOR of BECCLES: Water Leet: Amongst the Regulations are some referring to Beccles Bridge:
Secondly that whosoever... shall put any boat or keel through Beccles Bridge on the Sabbath Day in
time of Divine prayer or in the Sermon time shall forfeit to the lord of this leet for every such offence 3s
4d ...
Thirdly  that  whosoever...  shall  fasten  any  boat  or  keel  whatsoever by any means whatsoever to
Beccles Bridge or St Olives Bridge on the half next Beccles shall forfeit 12d
Fourthly ... any keel or great boat through Beccles Bridge downwards between sunset and sunrise
shall forfeit 3s 4d.
Fifthly... shall set any load or keel or boat fast  in Beccles Bridge or the half of St Olives bridge next to
Beccles shall with any quant[?] or boathook shod with iron thrust against the bridges to put such
loaden keel or boat through the said bridge or either of them shall forfeit 3s 4d.
AGREEMENT on BRIDGE: [Norfolk Record Office - Gillingham Estate Papers:  GIL/2/10, 717 x 8 ]
It is agreed between Nicholas Bacon, Esq of Gillingham of the County of Norfolk & Symon Smyth of
Wiston in the County of Norfolk Esq of the first part & William Emerton of Norwich freemason on the
other side that he the said William Emerton shall well & sufficiently repair the two piers or buttresses
that join on the side of the middle arch of the bridge with freestone with wrought & tarrace mortar a
yard high & the rest with freestone mortar & to take down & well joint all the battlements now lying &
new lay them as they ought to be & to repair both sides of the bridge now decayed with freestone
battlements near having the old battlements fallen off & to repair which said sides were formerly &
lastly built with freestone as also to repair all that wall of the east side formerly & lastly built with brick
& stone again & under the table of flintstone & above with brick & quoined with such brick as Trouse
bridge the quoin wall under the table wall is to be about two foot thick & above the table a brick & an
half as also to repair all such stone as shall be broken or wanting on Norfolk side of Beccles bridge
concerning which all this said work is intended to be bestowed as also he is to make a pillar on the
east side answerable to the standing on the west side & all this he is well & sufficiently to do within a
month after the date of these presents. And now the said Nicholas & the said Symon do covenant &
agree that the said William shall for his work well & sufficiently done have the full sum of eighteen
pounds of lawful money of England viz six pounds at the beginning four pounds more when he hath
half finished & the rest when he hath fully finished it in witness whereof we have hereunto put our
hands & seals the day & year above written.
Nicholas Bacon, Will Emerton, Simon Smyth
Sealed in the presence of          Dan Rayner   John Wolnough

 
1649
 

 
Beccles Manor Book 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1654
 

Gillingham Estate 5 Jun 
 

 
 

 
 

Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
1670
Corp of Beccles Fen 

There is no mention in the Corporation Minutes of the Bridge between 1670 and the termination of the
Corporation in  1835.
There may have been some small running expenses that are listed under the name of the stone mason
concerned in the accounts, but obviously there was no major restoration. I have not been through the
accounts thoroughly, but often there is a sum of money paid to a craftsman with no explanation as to
what the cost relates, so it would not be possible to identify
PAYMENT: Paid Nick Morse and Jo Crowe for breaking the ice to preserve the bridge.
WEATHER:  This  Winter  was particularly bitter with an average temperature of minus 1.2 degrees
Centigrade for December, January and February. The Thames froze. There were ice flows measuring
five kilometers off the Channel coasts and thirty kilometers in the north sea. Where there was no snow
cover in the South of England the frost  went down to a depth of nearly four feet. The snow cover
lasted for over a hundred and twelve days, when the average at that time was seventy five days.
Besides other charges, the purpose of which is not stated, the book records many upon the county for
repair  and  building  of  bridges.  Among  these  are  mentioned  the  bridges  of  Stratford,  Bourne,
Martlesham,  Claydon,  Wilford,  Bungay,  Mendham,  Brandeston,  Blythburgh,  Beccles, Cretingham,
Cosford  near  Hadleigh,  Seamour  [Semer], and Kettleburgh. In 1689 the money raised for repairing
bridges was ordered “to lye as a stock in banke, in Mr. Robert Clarke’s bands of Ipswich, who is
appointed treasurer for the same.” And again, in July 1696, when there was an order to raise 410. in
the county for similar purposes, the money is directed to be paid “to Mr. Robert Snelling of Ipswich,
treasurer for the bridge money.” In the following January 500 were ordered at the Beccles sessions
for “ye rebuilding of Bungay Bridge” and repairing others. In July 1699 an order was made at Beccles
quarter  sessions  for  raising  100  in  Beccles,  Woodbridge,  and  Ipswich  divisions,  towards  the
repairing of St. Olave’s and other county bridges. And in January 1701, 200 were raised in the same
division of the county towards building and repairing Blythburgh and Beccles  bridges.
MUTFORD  BRIDGE:  23  June:  Portreeve  to  pay  20  towards  the  repairing  of  Mutford  Bridge  or
Causeway according to a warrant from the Court of Commissioners of Sewers bearing date 9 June.
MUTFORD  BRIDGE:  20  November:  Portreeve  to  pay  5  being  charged  towards  the  repairing  of
Mutford Bridge.
Allowed Mr Purvis for a rate for the repair of Mutford Bridge 2s 0d.
[Jeffrey Purvis senior had been made a Feoffee in 1717. A Jeoffrey Purvis had been Portreeve in 1693,
but in 1710 the Corporation ordered that "Jeoffrey Purvis, one of the XII be discharged for that by
virtue or colour of a lease made to him by Mr Armstrong the Rector of Beccles of the tythes and
herbage  belonging  to  the  Rectory  hath  unduly  and illegally taken and exacted tythes or herbage
money in payment in lieu thereof of divers persons for and in respect of their keeping and depasturing
cattle on the fen contrary to the laws agreements and constitutions relating to the Fen"].!
Vestry Minutes 1733 to 1857:  There is no mention of Beccles Bridge
“BECCLES A PORT”. Meeting at Town Hall. HS Davey, Portreeve: “..A matter of First importance to
make it a Shipping Place & obtain direct navigation to the Sea.”
The best way to make River along to the Town deep enough to have vessels lay alongside the Quay
& wide enough for a Dock or Harbour. The Bridge could be converted to draw or swing Bridge or
removed higher up the River.
PLAN for CONVERTING the 3 arches of the present Bridge siuated in the parishes of Beccles in the
County of Suffolk &Gillingham in the County of Norfolk & converting it into a Balance Bridge [iron].
Joseph Stannard ? jun, Achitect & Surveyor, Norwich. 28 Nov 1834 [with plan]
Committee appointed to look at Beccles Bridge question
Beccles Bridge: Beccles Navigation Commissioners to hand over 1,000 to Waveney Valley Drainage
Commissioners when bridge is completed.
Beccles Bridge: Discussion of payment for new Bridge. [previous week also]
Beccles Bridge: Norfolk & Suffolk both interested in improving the Bridge. Would Beccles Council
contribute?. Agreed to offer 500
Beccles   Bridge:   Cost   would   be   5,000.   Waveney   Valley   Navigation   offered  1,100,  Beccles
Corporation 500. Cost would be 3,500 between Norfolk & Suffolk. Inconvenience caused by bend in
road at its two extremities. Norfolk City Magistrates did not recommend such an expenditure.
Adaire of Flixton advocated concrete bridge with iron girders for strengthening, like Homersfield
Beccles Bridge: Suffolk had refused to consider a new bridge any further on account of its expense.

 
 

1684:
1683/84  

Feoffees Accoiunts 
169 
6MS  Relating to Suffolk 
1719
Corp of Beccles Fen 
1719
Corp of Beccles Fen 

1719
 

 
 

1733
1830

 
Norwich Mercury 4 Sep 
 
 
1834
Nor Rec Off c/Scf 1/657

1865
1869

Beccles Paper 10 Jan 
Beccles Paper 20 Apr 

1869
1870

Beccles Paper 30 Nov 
Beccles Paper 12 Apr 
1870
Beccles Paper 25 Oct 

 
1871

 
Beccles Paper 18 Apr 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 

Norfolk Magistrates then came to the same conclusion.
Waterworks Company, unauthorised, dug a trench over the Bridge, buried a pipe in it & filled up the
trench.
BECCLES BRIDGE: The steps which led to its construction were briefly as follows :—In consequence
of the disastrous floods which occurred in October, 1882, a committee was appointed by the Town
Council, first, to consider if any steps could be taken to improve the drainage of the Waveney Valley
and, secondly, to urge upon the Magistrates of the Counties of Norfolk and Suffolk the importance of
constructing a now bridge over the Waveney at Beccles. With respect to the first object for which
they were appointed, the labours of the committee have, we regret to say, not yet been crowned with
success ; but with regard to the second, it has been otherwise. After negotiations, which lasted for
some months, a grant of 500 was obtained first from the Magistrates for the county of Norfolk, and
this was followed a few months later by a corresponding grant from the Suffolk Magistrates, which
was  made  on  the  condition  that  the  work  should  be  carried  on  by,  and  at  the  wish  of,  the
Commissioners  appointed  under  the  Beccles  Navigation  Act;  that  the  town  of  Beccles  should
contribute a sum of 2,000 towards the cost of the bridge; that the county of Suffolk should not be
asked to contribute more than 500 ; and that the work should be done under the supervision and to
the satisfaction of the Surveyors for the counties of Norfolk and Suffolk. The 2,000 contributed by
the town of Beccles was made up of a sum of rather less than 1,700, which was vested in the Beccles
Navigation Commissioners, and which resulted from tolls levied during the time that the Navigation
Act was in force; and a sum of rather mere than 300 contributed mainly by a few merchants who had
a special interest is improving the waterway of the river, and the communication between the two
counties by road.
The new bridge was erected in 1884 by the Beccles Navigation Commissioners, who had powers under
their Act of Parliament to remove the old bridge which was rebuilt in 1653, and which consisted of
three arches, and supported a roadway of only 11 feet in width. The new structure is a wrought-iron
bridge, consisting of two main continuous lattice girders, each 94 feet in length, resting, at the ends,
upon masonry abutment piers, and upon four screw piers, which are 2 an 1/2 feet in diameter—giving
47 foot clear waterway in the centre of the river, and 18 inches more headway for navigation than the
old bridge. The width over the bridge between the main girders is 20 feet, giving 17 feet of carriage-
way and three feet foot-way. The road is supported between the main girders upon rolled steel plates,
known as “Lindsay’s Patent.” The new bridge is repairable, as was the old one, jointly by the County
Authorities of Norfolk and East Suffolk. The stonework in the old bridge was used, as far as it could
be, in the construction of the abutments and wings of the new bridge. The new bridge was designed
by R.M. Brereton, Esq., M.I.C.E., the County Bridge and Road Surveyor for the County of Norfolk, and
executed under the joint directions of the said engineer and of B. M. Eyton, Esq., the County Surveyor
for East Suffolk. The iron work was executed by Messrs Head, Wrightson, and Co, of Stockton-on-
Tees, and the rest of the bridge work by Mr T.H. Blyth, of Foulsham in Norfolk,  who had previously
built the Falcon Bridge at Bungay.

1872
Beccles Paper 3 Dec 
1890
Beccles Almanack 
 
 

[1530
 

BOXFORD  CHURCHWARDENS’ ACCOUNTS 1530-61: Edited by Peter Northeast
“Until 1547, the whole of the expenditure relates to the upkeep of the church, churchyard and parish
properties,  together  with  that  of  the  bridge  which  seems  to  have  been  the  responsibility  of  the
churchwardens. Regular payments are made to the sexton, parish clerk and other employees, for wax,
frankincense  and  oil,  and  for  repairs  to  the  church  fabric,  furniture,  vestment  and  books,  and
especially to the bells. On several occasions there are legal expenses to do with the protection of the
parish’s title to its land and property. But never, apart from the bridge and the property, is anything
spent for the wider community, as in the repair of roads or the relief of the poor.”
payd for the postys too the breg (bridge) 
payd to John coo for castyng of gravel onto the breg
payd to herd for tember to the brege and workmanschep 
It. to Robert Tyler & Rycherd smythe for spredyng off Gravell on the brydge  
It. to hertwell For an yren to steye the same powpe the brydg 
It. to John barker for hys werk by the space of viij dayes 
It. for hys mette by the same tyme at iii d. the day 
It. for vj ankers with dobyll keyes 

Boxford Churchwardens
 

[1531 Boxford Churchwardens 
[1532 Boxford Churchwardens 
[1533 Boxford Churchwardens 
[1540 Boxford Churchwardens 
[1543 Boxford Churchwardens 
 
 
 

 

 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

             ij s. & ix d.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

viii d.
xxij d.
iiij d.
iid
ijs. viii d.
ij s.
vj s.

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 

 
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[1548

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

It. for xv steddys
It. for iij bord at iij s. the C & a quarter & odde Fotts 
It. to iij laborerys be the space of iiij dayes to stub & 
rame at vj d. a day eche of them for mett & wagys 
It. for x lodys of Cley 
It. to hertwell for ij li. of nayles 
It. to Jasper for xiij lodys of Gravell
It. to william Coo for stubbyng & Caryng of the same
It. to hertwell For a C of lede nayle wayng but ij li. 
It. to the same hertwell For makyng of a bend of  
owr owne Iren to the Caye (key) 
It. For a bord off xv ffotte to the brydge 
It. for nayles to the same 
It. to barker to ley the same For mette & wagys  
Itm. pd. for Caryenge of the gret stonys owt of the ryver 
Itm. pd. for lyme for the churche for the bredge & for
the churche houses xj seme & di 
Itm. pd. for gatherynge of two lodys of stonys for the bredge 
Itm. pd. for thr caryage of the seyde stonys 
Itrn. pd. For a lode di of Brycke & di lode of tyle 
Itm. pd. to Wylliam Coo for the sells of the churche 
house & for a post for the bredge 
ltm. pd. to Wyiliam Coo for the Caryage of a lode of  sande 
Itm. pd. to Thomas Marten for xxviij daye wurke 
wurkynge in the churche on the town shoppys on the
bredge on the churche house & on the churche walle
wagys & mete & drynke after vii d. le daye 
Itm. pd. to Marten men For xxx daye wurke upon that same wurke 
meate drynke & wages after vj d. le dayc
Itm. pd. to Thomas marten sarver for xxiiij daye wurke
upon that same wurke also meate drynke & wages after v d. le daye 
Itm. pd. for ij lodys of cleye for castynge & caryage 
pd. more for ij lodes of brycke for the brydge
payed to Rye for makyng of the corner of the bredge with 
bryk & for castyng of that syde of the bredge & for 
mendyng of the churche wall by yongs howse 
pd. to froste for castyng gravell owte of the ryver for the bredge
pd. to lambe & to marchante for carryeng of the gravell onto the bredge
payd for layeng off gravell on the brydg 

 
 
 
 

 
 

}
 
 
 
 
 

}
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

v s.
x s.
vj s.

 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

iij s. iiij d.
v d.
iiij d.
xx d.
vij d.
ij d.

 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

}
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

iiij d.
ij d.
vj d.
ij
xj  s.  vj  d.

 
 
 
 
d
Boxford Churchwardens

 
 

 
 

 
 
 


 
 
}
}
}
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
xvj

iij d.
viij d.
vii
iij  s.  vj  d.

 
 

 
 

 

 
 
 
 

s.
 
 

 
 

 
 

ii d.

 
 
 
 

s.
iiij
d.
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

xv s.
 
 
 


 
 
 
 
 
}
 
 
 

x s.
}
 
 

}

 
[1555
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

viii d
v s. iiij d.
iiij s. iiij d.

 
Boxford Churchwardens

 
 
 

 

 
 

[1556

viij d.
 
 

Boxford Churchwardens

 
[1561

 

xij d.
vij d.]

 
 
 
Boxford Churchwardens
THE RIVER
1864
Beccles Paper 12 Jan 

The River Waveney for the last week has been entirely frozen over. This has not occurred since the
winter of 1860-61. While this has put a stop to the trade of the Port & thrown out of employment those
who earn a livelihood by navigating the stream, it has also afforded a fund of intense enjoyment to
others who revel in the bracing exercise & delightful sport of skating. During the whole week the River
was literally crowded with people ... Each day the sport was continued until dusk, and in the evening
those who were prevented by business from skating at more seasonable times, turned night into day
by torches, and sped along the ice with equal safety.
Thomas  Farr,  Charles  Farr,  John  Farr  &  Charles  Sugden,  gentlemen  of  Geldeston  charged  with
assaulting Edwin Boaler of Beccles, ironmomger’s assistant at Barsham (before W Jecks, Esq [of 29
Ballygate],  Rev  RC  Denny,  Rev  JC  Safford  [of  Mettingham  Castle]  JF  Vincent  [of  Wrentham] &
Admiral Eden). The Bench tried to persuade the boys to settle out of Court.
Bealer & Chester Hadingham [son of the miller of London Road] were boating on the Waveney past
the engine house. They saw a boat coming straight towards them, about 10 yards off, they hailed it

1868
Beccles Paper 25 Aug 
 
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 

and steered for the shore. The four defendants blackguarded them, saying “They didn’t know one end
of the boat to another”, “You ought to have your mother with you.” They all went ashore and had a
fight, but the defendants pushed him into the water. “As I was falling I caught hold of Thomas Farr by
the hair & pulled him in with me.” Defendants fined 1 each. Bealer also fined 1 in a separate case.

BRIDGE HOUSE, GILLINGHAM
1814
Norwich Paper 10 Sep  

SALE at White Lion, Beccles by Mr Crowe: Freehold Estate (House, Office, Land, Granaries, etc) in
Gillingham near Beccles Bridge [Bridge House] Proprietor Mr Charles Carr Holland. - Corn, Coal &
Malt Trades.
SALE: Wharf, Granaries & Warehouses late occupied by Richard Thornton (foot of Beccles Bridge in
Gillingham) for Sale by B Rix

1839 
Norwich Mercury 16 Nov
1844 on Beccles Town Guide 1955 DARBY BROTHERS, Ltd. Timber Merchants. The business has been actively managed by members of

the Darby family from its foundation in 1844 by Mr Samuel Darby to the present day. A private limited
company was formed in 1912.
In the course of time considerable expansion has taken place and the company now posses extensive
timber  yards  and  a  well  equipped  electrically-driven  sawmill,  from  which timber in all its forms is
supplied to farmers and builders in the district. Messrs Darby Brothers, Ltd. also have an extensive

 
 

trade in coal, cement and other builders’ merchant supplies.
1844 on Beccles Town Guide 1998  DARBY BROS. LTD: Situated at the entrance to the town by the River Waveney, is one of the oldest

established companies in Beccles. Darby Bros. has been trading on this site for nearly 150 years. Up
until the early thirties, they owned two wherries which were used to transport timber and bricks from
their Darby Road brick works throughout broadland.
They are one of the few remaining English timber merchants in the district, specialising in oak and
other native hardwoods for construction and restoration work on churches, timber framed houses and
fumiture, etc. Although their base is home-grown timber, they also trade in a wide range of imported
hardwood and softwoods for the building and joinery trades.
Samuel Darby, innkeeper & George Whitehead, stone mason owned Mary & Sarah - built Yarmouth
1819; schooner, clench built 31 tons. Master, John Rand. Sold 1855. Lost off Filey 1860.
ADVERTISEMENT: Samuel Darby, Coal & Timber Merchant, Bridge Street. Every description of red &
white  Bricks,  Pavements, Pan & Roof Tiles, Drain Pipe, Chimney Pots etc. Stockholm & Coal Tar,
Pantile  Splines  &  Ceiling  Laths;  Scantling  of  every description cut to order. Wherries constantly
attending at Yarmouth upon the Steam Traders from London, Hull & Newcastle for conveyance of
goods to Norwich, Beccles & Lowestoft.
FLOODS OF 1879 There were disastrous floods at the end of July 1879, the worst for 60 years: Heavy
rains fell on Saturday night and for the next three days, almost without break. The Barsham marshes
became  a  great  lake.  Gillingham  dam  was  completely  covered.  The  only  communication  between
Gillingham and Beccles was by boats charging 2d per head. The Beccles fen was covered with  2 or 3
feet of water. 15 hay stacks were lost. The Yarmouth line was flooded and the ballast washed away.
On  Wednesday  the  water  was  rising  1  foot  an  hour  at  the  swing  bridge,  whose  pilot  had  to
accommodate his pigs in his own house until he could move them to safety. Mr Darby's timber in the
form of planks and logs floated away, while whole trees were carried long distances. His loss was
2000. His house was flooded during Tuesday night with about 2 feet of water [This is Bridge House,
Monty Pitkin’s House]. The water was still standing in his house on Friday night. Mr Johnson, one of
his neighbours had to take refuge with his family in a yacht. In Bridge Street houses were flooded and
food and drink was handed in through the upper windows. At the brewery casks floated around in all
directions.
BRIDGE HOUSE, late Samuel Darby. Household Furniture; 337 Lots.
LIST OF BOATS REGISTERED IN 1900: Darby Brothers
Ethel - wherry, 20 tons; Leonard - wherry, 20 tons
Darby, AW: Bridge House, Yacht, Ormonde
Darby, AW: Bridge House, Yacht, Olive 
Darby, AW: Bridge House, Yacht, White Duck  ?

 
 
1853
Lowstft Rec Off 1265/1227
1858
Beccles Paper 20 Apr 
1879
 

1885
1900
 
 
 
 

Beccles Paper 26 Feb 

 
 
 
 
 

13 tons
15 tons

Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
HIPPERSON’S, NEAR BECCLES/GILLINGHAM BRIDGE

1745
 
 
 
 
 
1745
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

WILL of John Lillistone:-
ALL THOSE hid Marshes lying in Gillingham in the occupation of Robert Bond
To John Lillistone, his son all his Lands, but paying the following Legacies:
His son William Lillistone 100; His daughter Anne Lillistone 100.
Executors: John Lillistone, his son & Edward Utting of Beccles, baker
Died May 1746 aged 55; Will proved in Archdeaconry Court of Suffolk 30 May 1746
Indenture BETWEEN John Lillistone of Beccles, Wherryman of ONE PART
John Lillistone, son & heir apparent
ALL THOSE pieces of Land in Gillingham enclosures of Marsh or Meadow Land , then late the estate
of Edward Whitlock, and then late purchased by John Lillistone, (the father) of Matthew Cutlove in
the occupation of John Lillistone, the Father
ABUTTING upon Beccles Dam SOUTH
The Lands of Sir Edmund Bacon on the NORTH & WEST,
River Waveney towards the EAST
About 4 Acres
WILL of John Lillistone, the son
To my son Samuel Lillistone ALL my Estate & Effects in Gillingham, Beccles, Barsham, St Andrew &
Bungay, but paying Legacies:
To Elizabeth, his wife 50, & a further 100
To his daughter, Ann Freston 700
To his daughter Elizabeth Cole  700
But if either of the daughters die, it should be divided between her children
To his daughter May Lillistone 1,000
To his brother William 20 every year as long as he lived.
To his sister Ann Crickmer 10 every year as long as she lived.
To Samuel Preston 50 when he reaches age of 21.
To his servant, Samuel Norman 5 5s 0d
Executors: Samuel Lillistone & Ann Freston.
Died February 1784. Will proved in the Archdeaconry Court of Suffolk 26 November 1785
WILL of Samuel Lillistone. Appointed his wife, Elizabeth & John, his son Executrix
Sell all his Messuages, Lands, Tenements etc
Died 26 June 1829; Proved in Prerogative Court of Canterbury 5 October 1829
Indenture BETWEEN Elizabeth Lillistone of Beccles, Widow, Rev John Lillistone of Barsham, Clerk of
the FIRST PART
Richard Thornton the younger of Beccles, beer brewer
William Hoddy of Loddon, gent 
for 400
ALL THOSE pieces of Land in the occupation of Riochard Thornton
ABUTTING on a Dam called Beccles or Gillingham Dam in part & on Land of Samuel Last SOUTH
Lands late of Sir Edmund Bacon, Bart & then of Susan Elizabeth Schutz, spinster NORTH & WEST
River Waveney in part & lands of Samuel Last EAST
by estimation 4 acres
Indenture 7 July
BETWEEN Richard Thornton FIRST PART
Samuel Last of Gilingham, gentleman SECOND PART
Edward Colby Sharpin of Beccles, gent THIRD PART
ALL THAT piece of Marsh Land (being part of the previous indenture) & now in the occupation of
Samuel Last, containing two perches; in LENGTH 141 ft from Gillingham Dam, counting in BREADTH
in the widest part 9 ft,
ABUTTING on the Premises of Samuel Last EAST
Upon a Dike recently cut by Richard Thornton WEST
AND ALL THAT part of Land which now forms part of the Dike & is covered with water, extending
along the whole of the WEST of the Land, in width 5ft from the Western Boundary
INDENTURE of Mortgage BETWEEN

 
 
 
 
1782
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1828
 
 
1833

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1833
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

SECOND PART
THIRD PART

 
 
 

 
 
 

1836
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Richard Thornton & Sarah his wife FIRST PART
Samuel Bignold of Norwich, Esq SECOND PART
James Copeman & William Hoddy THIRD PART
for the sum of 10,000 with other hereditaments

 
 

Others were involved in Indentures: Matin Bristowe of Burgh St Peter, farmer & James Copeman of
Loddon, gent. Then John Read of Langley in 1834 lent an extra 600

 
1834
1839

 
 
 

Richard Thornton built warehouses, granaries, Coal Bins & other buildings on the Land
John Read demanded of Richard Thornton repayment of his principal & interest.

1840
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Indenture 7 January 1840
BETWEEN John Read FIRST PART
William Milnes Atkinson of Barsham, merchant SECOND PART
Richard Thornton not having repaid interest or principal of 1000, put up for auction, purchased by
WM Atkinson for 145: 2 acres 2 rods of Meadow or Pasure Land
ABUTTING on the Turnpike Road or Gillingham Dam SOUTH
Land of Miss Schutz NORTH & WEST
A Dike dividing the land from the Wharf & other part of the Premises sold by John Read to John Crisp
EAST      - WM Atkinson paying half the expense of draining & cleansing the Dike.
Indenture 14 February 1840
BETWEEN John Crisp the younger of Beccles, merchant ONE PART
William Milnes Atkinson OTHER PART
Purchased  recently  by  John  Crisp  one  acre  &  a  half,  with  the  spacious  Wharfs,  Warehouses,
Granaries, Coal-bins, Stables, & other buildings
ABUTTING  the  Land  of  Miss  Schutz  on the EAST by the River Waveney in part & by Land &
Premises of  late Samuel Last & then of WM Atkinson SOUTH
Land & Premises of WM Atkinson in part & Gillingham Dam & WEST
WM Atkinson bankrupt on 5 July
WM Atkinson owed Henry Boyce, of Giselham, gent 190 Mortgage
Indenture 26 August 1844
BETWEEN Henry Boyce ONE PART
John Banham SECOND PART
for 145

 
 
 

 
 
 

1840
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
1841
 
1844
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

THE STREET
1869
Beccles Paper 20 Apr 

The Cottages on the south side of the approach to the Bridge are to be demolished, would improve
access to the new Bridge.

BRIDGE STREET  ABB.

1660c
 
1668
1717
1721

Task A20 
John Adams, for a tent in Bridge Street, parcel of three tenements, (post Thomas
 

Fryers)  (folio 216)  
John Adams, for a tent in Bridge Street, (now Mrs Castle) 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Task 8d
Rent 1d
Task 8d
Rent 1d

Rosehall Manor Rental 

Thomas Fryer, for a tent in Bridge Street, late John Adams 
Thomas Fryer, late Wiggins, Randall, Cully 

Task F 20 
Rosehall Manor Rental 
 
 
[Wiggon & Cully figure in 18 Northgate; Mrs Castle at 44 Northgate]
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
BRIDGE STREET 2

1857
1882

Beccles Paper 8 Sep 

SALE: Dwelling: Benjamin Bensley
SALE: LOT 5, late Harriet Meen: BRIDGE STREET; a Brick & Tiled HOUSE & SHOP, with Yard  &
Shed, adjoining Lot 4 at the junction with Fen Lane, now occupied by by Mrs Neech
[passed over]

Beccles Paper 2 May 
 
 
BRIDGE STREET 4 formerly a Blacksmith’s Shop
1865
Beccles Paper 26 Sep 

Philip Hayward, cooperage, Bridge Street, succeeded to the business carried on for many years by his
Father.
SALE:  LOT  4,  late  Harriet  Meen:  BRIDGE  STREET:  a  brick  &  Tiled  COTTAGE,  adjoining  the
Maltster’s Arms, two Coopers’ Shops with loft over, Cart Shed & Yard occupied by Philip Hayward
[passed over]

1882
Beccles Paper 2 May 
 
 

 
BRIDGE STREET 8

1882
1803
 

Abstract of Title to Estate of Sophia Meen decsd & Harriet Meen, decsd: LOTS 3 & 4
INDENTURE BETWEEN
William West, linen weaver, & Susannah, his wife, late the wife of John Brewer, stone cutter, decsd, &
his last Will, ONE PART
William Barnard, gent of the OTHER PART  
To the use of William West & Hannah his wife, the longest liver of them, & after to his heirs.

Abstract 

 
 

 
 

 
 

1829
 
 
1831
 

 
 
 

WILL of William West, 11 April
Executors to sell all his Messuages , shops, cottes, land & hereditaments in Bridge Street, Beccles.
He died 24 November 1829. Proved 19 February 1831,
INDENTURE : February:
BETWEEN:  Osborne  Clarke,  late  of  Westhall,  but  then  of  Uggeshall,  farmer  &  William  Draper,
Governor of the House of Industry there of FIRST PART
George William Brown Bohun of Beccles, SECOND PART
Hannah, Sophia & Harriet Meen all of Gillingham, THIRD PART
Sold for 460.  Yearly Costs: Land Tax & free rent to Manor of Frostenden.
ALL THOSE messuages formerly of John Woolby, after that of John Brewer (both deceased) & then
late of William West, with the houses, outhouses, shops, warehouses & gardens. Also a lean-to then
occupied as a cottage
BETWEEN the Malting Office (formerly a messuage & land of Martha Elmy, widow; after of William
Batten [Hatton?] & then of Messrs Gurneys, Turner & Brightwen) WEST
the next described Messuage & land formerly of John Calver EAST.
[Bridge Street No 10, - later Crisp]

Deed 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
1831

 
 
 
 
 

Bridge Street on the SOUTH;
Lands & hereditaments, and lands of Gillings, formerly of Mr West on the NORTH.
Late in the occupation of William West & Honor Turner
[Fen Lane - now part of the Maltings]
ALSO

BRIDGE STREET 6 & 4
 
 

ALL THAT piece of ground with the messuages, tenements or cottages & blacksmith’s shop with
outhouses, garden & a moiety of a well, formerly Thomas Westwood, & in the occupation of John
Calver & William Tripp; late of Richard Burwood & James Miller & a cottage was then untenanted.
BETWEEN a Messuage & yard late called an outhouse & yard formerly of Luke Crouching, since of

 
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
10 

William  Allington,  decsd,  afterwards  of  John  Calver  &  then  of  Elizabeth  Bensley in part & the
premises described next in Fen Lane EAST
The  Messuage  &  Garden  formerly  of  Thomas  Burrell,  since  of  John  Newhouse  &  his  wife,
afterwards of John Brewer & Susannah, his wife, then late of William West, in Part, & lastly here
described WEST
And upon land late belonging to the last premises & sold by William West to -- Gillings NORTH
Upon Bridge Street SOUTH
(The last premises were formerly Edward Macham, then late of John Calver)
ALSO
INDENTURE: BETWEEN
John Calver of FIRST PART 
Matthias Abel, Edward Burton & Stephen Spratt SECOND PART
William West THIRD PART
George WB Bohun FOURTH PART
ALL THAT tenement late of John Calver, formerly used as an ash-house, afterwards used as a cow
house & stable & then converted into three cottages with a yard, late in the occupation of John
Calver
BETWEEN the Common Way leading from Northgate to the Beccles Fen [Fen Lane] EAST
part of the last described premises WEST
the Premises of Elizabeth Benslet SOUTH
the Premises of William West, then of  --- Gillings NORTH
late in the occupation of William Stubbs, Robert Webb & Robert Alger,
late also the estate of John Calver, formerly of William Allington
Hannah Meen died leaving her share of the Estate to Sophia & Harriet Meen

 
 

 
 
 
 
1798
 
 
 
 
1831

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
1852

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

BRIDGE STREET 8:  Maltster’s Arms until 1922

1858
1880

 

LAW: James Crickmer, Landlord of the Maltster’s Arms, open at illegal hours 
DROWNING  Bungay  waterman,  James  Cossay  left  wherry  at  Mr  Crisp’s  quay  [probably  by  the
Bridge], went to Page’s beerhouse [Maltster’s Arms, Bridge Street] which he left at 11pm. returning to
wherry in the dark tripped over rope attaced to a wherry, fell into river and was drowned. Jury said
path should be wider and no ropes to stretch over path.
SALE: LOT3: late Harriet Meen: BRIDGE STREET: a well-accustomed Brick & Tiled BEERHOUSE, the
MALTSTER’S ARMS, with large Yard, Stable, Cow House & Cart Shed, approached  from Fen Lane,
now occupied by Robert Page. Rental 20
[withdrawn at 525]
LICENCES: Maltster’s Arms, Bridge Street to HC Cowles;
LICENCES: Maltster’s Arms to Wm R Johnson
One Bell to Harry C Cowles, late of the Maltster’s Arms.
MALSTER’S ARMS: House in BRIDGE STREET: Licence transferred to the present house in October
1913, Premises Poor Rate 20-18s. Income Tax 18. Annual licence duty 30.
Lodgers taken in. In the Summer a good Yard & Stall for 8 horses. 3 fully licensed houses & 2 Beer
Houses within 533 yards. Used by malsters & those in the neighbourhood. One of the Stables was let
from the house. A number of carts used the Yard.
Colchester Brewery Co, the owner’s trade in 1918: 80 & 1/4 barrels & 297 dozen bottlesof bottled beer.
Licence referred.

Fined 1s
East Suff Gaz 9 Mar 
1882
Beccles Paper 2 May 

 
1885
1892
 
1918

 
East Suff Gaz 17 Feb 
East Suff Gaz 5 Apr 

 
 

 
 
 
 
1922
 

SALE: Colchester Brewing Co: No 8 BRIDGE STREET, formerly The Malster’s Arms Beerhouse, the
licence of which has been surrendered. In the rear of the property is a spacious Yard, opening to FEN
LANE,  in  which  are  Brick  &  Tile  buildings,  comprising  Stabling  for  8  Horses & other buildings.

Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
11 

Another range of buildings comprising Stabling for 4 horses, in the occupation ofMr Fred Craske.
The Property is well adapted for alteration to a Shop or  Refreshment Rooms, being only a few yards
distant from the River Waveney. Tenure freehold.
[purchased Mr E Driver 300]

 
 
 
 
CENSUS:- 1881

Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 

1041
1042
1043
1044
1045
1046
1047

Dwelling:
William MOYSE 
Esther MOYSE 
Charles SMITH 
William WARD 
Samuel WARD 
Samual PURLARD 

Bridge St (Maltsters Arms)

M 
M 

29 
30 
9 
5 
3 
79 

M 
F 
M 
M 
M 
M 

Worlingham, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Ipswich, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 

Head 
Wife
Stepson ((Lodger))
Step Son
Step Son
Boarder

Maltsters Lab

 
 

Scholar
 
Scholar
W 
Domestic General Lab

Br 
Br 

1035
1036

Dwelling:
Robert PAGE
Employ 1 Man
Sarah PAGE
Kate E. SUTTON 
Emma KEABLE 
Henry CAPON 

Bridge St (Maltsters Arms)
M 
Head 
60
M
St James ((South Glemham)), Suffolk
Beerhouse   Kper   &   Farmer  Of  10  Acrs  Of  Land

Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 

M 
55 

F 
10 
18 
54 

1037
1038
1039
1040

Halstow, Kent, England
F 
F 
M 

Wife
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Thurlton, Norfolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 

 

Grandaur
Serv 
Lodger

Scholar
Domestic Servant General
General Lab

U 
U 

Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
12 
BRIDGE STREET 10: Crisp’s Maltings

1576
1593
 
1633c
1637c
 
1662
 
1683

Task Nor 4 

Robert Warpole, for his 2 tenements, the one late Botswaine, & the other late Cannes 
Edmund King, for his 2 tenements lying together, the one late Henry Botswaine &
the other Henry Cannes 
John Smyth, [will 1639] tenement sometime Edmund King, for Botswaine (folio 123) 
John Wells, tenement sometime Botswaine, after Nursey, before King 
(post Henry Harbor) [See Biography John Wells] 
John Smith, tenement in Bridge Street, sometime King, after Botswaine, late
John Smith (folio 227) 
INDENTURE between Martha Smith of  Beccles, widow, relict of John Smith the younger of Beccles,
tanner, deceased & John Smith, heir of the said John Smith of ONE PART
Isaac Smith, plumber, of the OTHER PART
ALL THAT Messuage with appurtenances wherein Martha Smith & Isaac Crisp now dwelleth & all
the houses, buildings, stables, yards, gardens & orchards
BETWEEN the Messuage & Yards late John Horning & now of Frances Burrell, widow EAST
The Messuage & Yards late of Richard Smith, deceased, WEST
Bridge Street, SOUTH
The Fen of Beccles NORTH
Will pay 4 per year for 50 years, in equal sums on the four feasts of the Church in the Porch of St
Michael’s Church
Henry Harbor, late Wells, sometime Botswaine, Nursey & King
John Stockwood, tenement in Bridge Street, late Smyth, King & Botswaine 
Margaret Stockwood, tenement in Bridge Street, formerly Smith, King & Botswaine 
Robert Le Grys, late Stockwood, the house by the Bridge 
Robert Le Grys, late Stockwood 
Robert Le Grys, Esq., tenement in Bridge Street, now a malthouse, late
Mr Stockwood, formerly Smith, King, Botswaine 
SALE: Robert Le Grys, 17 October 1767:
A large and convenient malthouse near the Bridge with half an acre of land,
under lease to a good tenant, who does the repairs at the yearly rent of 11.
Robert Le Grys, [died 1767] late Stockwood, vide William Crowfoot, under the title
Artis 

Task 6d
Task Nor 4 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Task 6d
Task 6d

Task S3 
Task W15 

 
 

 
 
 
 
Task 6d
Task S38 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Task 6d
Deeds 100 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

1711
1718
1723
1729
1761
1764
 
1767
 
 
1772
 
1800.1
1800.2
1828
 
 
1835

Task H38 
 
 

Task 6d
 

Task S54 
Task 6d
Task S59 

Task 6d
 
Rent 6d 1/2d

Rosehall Manor Rental 

 
 

 
 

Rent 6d
Rosehall Manor Rental 
 
 
 
Task L48 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Task 6d
Rosehall Manor Rental 

 
William Hatton
Charles Holland

[This included rents for other properties] 
 
 
 
Rent 3s 5d 1/2d  
Rosehall Manor Rental 

Messrs Gurney, Turner & Brightwen, bankers. A malting office, granary and
premises in Bridge Street, late Charles Holland, William Hatton and Stockwood
(later Thornton & Crisp 1837) 
Richard Thornton, brewer and John Crisp, merchant. Malting office, granary and premises in Bridge
Street, late Messrs Gurney, Turner and Brightwen, before Charles Holland. 
jun) 
Thornton & Co
Richard Thornton, mortgage of 7,500 altogether to Samuel Bignold 
Fiat of Bankruptcy against Richard Thornton, the younger, of Beccles, beer brewer, dealer & chapman
Wharf, Granaries & warehouses late occupied by Richard Thornton (at foot of Beccles Bridge) for sale
by B Rix.
John Crisp
John Crisp exiting from the Manor [buying himself out of the Manor]

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
Rent 6d
Rosehall Manor Rental 

(later   John   Crisp,
Rent 6d

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1836
1837
1839
1839

Rosehall Manor List  
Rosehall Manor Rental 
 
 
Norwih Paper 30 Mar 
Norwich Paper 16 Nov 

1849
1867

Rosehall Manor List  
Rosehall Manor List  
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
13 
Poor Law Rates

 
1756
1760
1765
1770
 
1775
 
1781
 
 
1807
1810
1814
1820
1824
1828
 
 
 
1832
 
 
 
1841
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

OCCUPANT 
Mr Robert Le Grys, Malt House 
Mr Robert Le Grys, Malt House 
Mr Robert Le Grys, Malt House 
Mrs Elizabeth Rede, House 
more Malt House
Mrs Elizabeth Rede, House 
more Malt House
Mr Hatten, for House 
more Malt House & Meadow 
more new Granary 
CC Holland, Malt, Granary & Counting House 
CC Holland 
CC Holland 
Messrs Stead 
Messrs Stead 
Messrs Stead & Granary
Stock 
New Malting Office 
Cinder Office 
Mr Patrick Stead Granary
Stock 
Cinder Oven 
Malting Office 
Atkinson, WM
Atkinson, WM
Atkinson, WM
Atkinson, WM
Atkinson, WM
Atkinson, WM

 
 

OWNER
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

6 - 10
6 - 10
6 - 10
5 - 10
6 - 10
5 - 10
6 - 10
4
5
2 - 10
16
16
20
19
25 - 13 -4
28 - 13 -4
1
26
1 - 6 - 8
28 - 13 -4
1
1 - 6 - 8
26
77 

7-10 
10 

 
 
 

 
 

 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Atkinson, Wm 
Atkinson, Wm 
Atkinson, Wm 
Atkinson, Wm 
Atkinson, Wm 
Atkinson, Wm 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Malt Office
Barn 
Land 3-0-0 acres
Garden 3 acres
Cinder Oven
Coal House

 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
14 
BRIDGE STREET 12
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
15 
BRIDGE STREET:- 14:-   THE SHIP  
 
 
 
Northgate Y

1576
1593
 

Task Nor 5 

Nicholas Boyce, for his three tents late Darnells 
John Bretteyne, for three tents lying together, Thomas Darnell, late Nicholas
Boyce 

 
 
 
Task 1s 4d
Task Nor 5 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Task 1s 4d
DIVISION OF PROPERTY

1656c
1668
1679
 
1693
1700
1705
1728
 
 
 
1736
 
1751
1760

Task B51 

Thomas Burrell, cooper, for a tent late Simon Welton (folio 200)
Thomas Burrell, for a tent late John, since Thomas Bretton 
Frances Burrell, widow of Thomas Burrell, sometime Thomas John, after
Lockington & Bretton (folio 270) 
Widow Shepard, for part of  a tent in Northgate (Robert Barber)
Widow Sheppard, part of a tent in Northgate
Robert Sheppard, for a tent late Thomas Burrell 
TO BE LET: The Ship tavern, part of it new built with a good staithe
belonging to it, standing nigh the Bridge. Enquiries Tobias Chandler.
[Tobias Chandler, was the gaoler of the Prison in Beccles. He  seems to have
followed a subsidiary occupation as a house agent.]

Robert Barber & Robert Bond, for part of a tent in Northgate, formerly
Shepherd
Rebecca Wake, [widow, died 1764] for a tent in Northgate late Sheppard
To be let... Ancient & well accustomed Public House known by the sign of the Ship  situate in Beccles
near the Bridge & has a convenient Quay belonging to it upon the River which leads to Yarmouth &
Norwich. Late in occupation of John Holmay, now of his widow. Enquiries at House or Sam Caley,
Gorleston.
Rebecca Wake, late Folkard [Shepard?], late Glikess 
William Hatton, tent in Northgate late Robert Wake 
William Hatten, tent in Northgate, late Shephard, formerly Burrell & since of
Penelope Elizabeth Wake.
Thomas Farr, The Ship 
BECCLES QUARTER SESSIONS: 1.) John Mann, Landlord of the Ship Inn charged with permitting
persons of ill fame in the said House between 1 & 2 o’clock in the morning of Tuesday 14th February.
TRANSPORT: John Stanford informs the Public he has engaged a light Barge to sail between Beccles
& Yarmouth for the conveyance of Goods & Parcels. To be taken in & booked by Mr Lydamore’s The
Ship near the Bridge. Sails from Beccles Tuesday & Friday; from Yarmouth Wednesday & Saturdays
at 11 am. Handsome Cabin for accommodation of Passengers.
Thomas Farr, The Ship, late Hatton, formerly Wake 
Thomas Farr, The Ship, late Hatton, formerly Smith 
HS Farr
SALE: Beccles Brewery: Lot XVIII
The  Ship  at  Beccles,  situated  on  the  Quay,  near the Bridge, at the entrance of the Town; in the
occupation of Mr William Crowford:
CONSISTING   OF  Bar,  Tap  Room,  Two  Parlours,  Four  Sleeping  Rooms,  Three  Attics,  Cellar,
Washhouse, Pantry, &c. Yard; and Stabling for thirty horses. FREEHOLD.
ANNUAL OUTGOINGS: Land Tax ; Free Rent to the Manor of Beccles  7d 1/2d
Free Rent to the Manor of Ros Hall and Ashmans 
Fred Morse
WEATHER: Heavy Rains. Marshes flooded. Hermitage & Ship flooded 2 ft.
ADVERTISEMENT: WINES & SPIRITS Edward Bevan Tench (late Farr & Son) Importer of Wines &
Spirits,  Blyburgate,  has  succeeded  to  this Establishment. Thornton & Tench, Wholesale & Retail
Brewers at the Brewery, Blyburgate & the Ship Brewery, Northgate, Beccles.

 
 

Task 4d
 

Rosehall Manor Rental 
Rent

 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
Rent 3d 1/2d
 
 

Task 4d
Beccles  Manor Rental 
Beccles  Manor Rental 
 

 
 

Rent 3d 1/2d
Task 4d

Task S 48 
 
25 May 1728

 
 
 

Beccles  Manor Rental 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Rent 3d 1/2d?
Rent 3d 1/2d

Beccles  Manor Rental 
Norwich Merc 26 Apr 

1761
1765
1766
 
1804
1809

Rosehall Manor Rental 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Rent 4d
Rent 3d 1/2d

Beccles  Manor Rental 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Task 4d
Rent 7d 1/2d

Beccles  Manor Rental 
Bury Post 10 Apr 
1816
Nor Merc 20 Apr 

1829
1829
1851
1852
 

Beccles  Manor Rental 

 
 

 
 


Rent 3d 1/2d
Rent 4d

Beccles  Manor Rental 
Rosehall Manor Courtl 
Rix Coll Geog 
 
 
 

 
 
1853
1853 
1853 

 
 

7d 1/2d
Rosehall Manor Court 
Norwich Mercury 23 Apr
Norwich Mercury 30 Apr
Ship Inn, open at 11.30pm on Sunday. Fined 11s 6d

1857
1863

COURT: Alfred Darby,
At 11 am on Tuesday Charles Marshall, employed by Messrs Thornton was driving a horse & cart

Beccles Wkly News 22 Dec
Beccles Paper 2 Jun 

near  the  Bridge  -  the  horse  suddenly  fell  into  very  deep  water,  dragging  the  cart  with  him  &
precipitating the man into the River. The accident was observed by James Flowers, Landlord of the

Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
16 

Ship, who immediately took a boat moored nearby & went to Marshall’s assistance. This however
proved very difficult from the violent plunging of the horse - the drowning man was rescued as he was
sinking for the last time. Drs Dashwood & Peskett after half an hour restored animation.
SALE of FURNITURE; The Ship Inn (under a Bill of Sale)
Suspected Murder at the Ship of Mrs Flowers, wife of the Publican.
THE SUPPOSED WIFE MURDER AT BECCLES.
Lowestoft Journal October 1880
On Wednesday morning, at six o'clock, the wife of James Flowers, landlord of the Ship Inn, near the
Bridge, was found lying dead in the tap-room, and from the fact that the house had been closed at a
very early hour on the previous evening, and other circumstances, a good deal of excitement was felt
in the neighbourhood. An inquest was held before C. W Chaston. Esq., County Coroner, on Thursday
morning, when Alfred Francis, engine driver, in Mr. Darby's employ. who lives next door to the Ship
Inn, said he was in the habit of calling Flowers every morning at six o'clock. On Wednesday morning
Flowers was up when he went by, and called him in, and said, "There's a rather bad Job happened.
here; the poor Old girl lay here dead"  Francis then went into the tap-room and saw the deceased lying
on the floor with her head nearly on the threshold of the cellar door, and her feet towards the window
of the tap-room. The witness, being in a hurry, could not stop to make a close examination, but sent
his children for a doctor and policeman. He was unable to say whether Flowers and his wife lived
comfortably together, but he had seen the deceased the worse for drink.
Hannah Weelingham, a young girl who is staying with Francis, said she had often seen the deceased  
the worse fur drink. She last saw her alive at six o'clock on Tuesday night, when she was lying on her
face  in  the  cellar.  Witness  lifted  her  up,  and helped her into the bar and sat her on a chair. She
afterwards  went  for  the  charwoman  because  she thought the deceased needed help. She saw no
bruises except for an old one in the eye..
Harriet Beane said she had been charwoman to the deceased for eleven years. She described how the
last witness came for her, and that on her accompanying the girl back to the Ship at half past six
o'clock, they found the doors and windows closed. The witness tapped at the bar window, and then
Flowers put his head out of the window above and told her his wife was in bed. Not feeling satisfied
the witness went back to the house again at eight o'clock, but could make no one hear. She said she
was much surprised to find the house closed so early, as she had never known it to be shut up till past
eleven. She had frequently seen the deceased the worse for drink, and had seen bruises upon her, but
when she asked deceased how they came she would make no answer, only burst into tears, Mary Ann
Ward and Sarah Ward, married women also gave evidence, the first as to the deceased's drinking
habits; the second with reference to cries of "Murder", which she told the Inspector of Police she
heard  about  ten  o'clock  on  Tuesday  night. She gave her evidence very reluctantly, and said she
believed the cries were made by an invalid lady who lives close by, and who is out of her mind.
Mr EB Crowfoot, surgeon said he had made an external examination of the body of deceased and also
a post mortem examination. He found bruises on the arm, thigh, left side, and face. On post mortem
examination he found ten of the ribs had been broken on the left side, the fracture being continued in
four of the lower ones. On the right side eight of the lower ribs were fractured, and he attributed these
injuries to compression in the chest, perhaps by kneeling. He attributed the cause of death to shock,
consequent  on  the  serious  injury  to  the  ribs, which could not have been merely from a fall. The
anoemic condition of the brain, the pale and healthy appearance of the lungs, and the emptiness of the
right side of the heart, all pointed to sudden death. Death probably ensued very quickly after such
injuries, especially considering the condition of the brain, and the commencing fatty changes of the
heart.
Mr WT McComb, assistant to Messrs Crowfoot, corroborated, and the inquiry was adjourned at this
stage till Friday.
Flowers was detained in custody.
VERDICT OF THE JURY
The enquiry touching the death of Susan Ann Flowers, aged 67, was resumed at the Police Court,
Beccles,  on  Friday,  before  Mr CW Chaston, coroner. The Chief Constable and the Deputy Chief-
Constable were present; and Mr Dowsett watched the case on behalf of the prisoner Flowers.
John Finch, groom, in the employ of Mr S Darby said he was well acquainted with the deceased and
Mr Flowers. He went to the Ship Inn on Tuesday night, about six o'clock, when Flowers told him "My

1880
1880
 
 
 

East Suff Gaz 19 Oct 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
17 

old woman has been on drinking again," and "She is a high mettled old woman , and she will have her
own way." He afterwards heard the deceased make a sort of groaning noise in the bar, the same he
had often heard her make when she was the worse for drink. He had seen her the worse for drink so
often that he did not pay any regard to the noise. No one to his knowledge was in the house when he
left, besides Flowers and his wife. Flowers was the worse for drink, though he was not drunk. On
Wednesday morning at 11, the witness called in at the Ship, and saw Flowers, and said, "Why, you
must have locked up the door as soon as I got out." Flowers replied "Yes, you were the last one that
went out of the house." He also said he thought he had better shut the house up and go to bed, as
Mrs Flowers was the worse for drink, and lying there, it would look very bad for any one to come in.
Charlotte Mills, wife of John Mills, waterman, Beccles, also said she was well acquainted with the
deceased, who had at different times complained to her about her husband beating her. Early one
morning between haysol and harvest, the deceased came to her house and asked witness to take her
in and take care of her. She was afraid to go home alone, and would have witness go back with her.
When they got back to the Ship Inn, Flowers did not seem very angry, but they had been quarrelling.
At this stage the enquiry was again adjourned until half-past five o'clock, when Inspector Bardwell
said he had ascertained that Finch was the only person who entered the Ship Inn during the absence
of the girl Willingham and her return on Tuesday night. He had also enquired about Mrs Flower's
state on Tuesday, and her sisters informed him that though she was noisy, she was not shrieking or
calling out "Murder".
The evidence of the witnesses was then read over to them, and signed.
The girl Willingham, recalled, said the deceased did not appear to be in any pain when she assisted
her on Tuesday night from the cellar to the bar.
By permission of the Coroner, Mr Dowsett addressed the jury in the prisoner's behalf, after which the
Coroner briefly summed up, and the jury retired to consider their verdict.
After  thirty  minutes'  consideration,  the  jury  returned  a  verdict  of "Wilful Murder" against James
Flowers.
MAGISTERIAL INQUIRY
The prisoner James Flowers, innkeeper, Beccles, was brought before the Magistrates - R Dashwood,
Esq. (Chairman), WE Crowfoot, Esq., and the Mayor - on Saturday, and charged with the wilful murder
of his wife, on the 12th October.
Mr FJ Dowsett appeared for the prisoner.
The first witness called was Hannah Willingham, aged 19, who repeated the evidence she gave at the
inquest, to the effect that she went into the Ship Inn on Tuesday evening, about six o'clock, and
finding the deceased lying on the floor of the cellar, picked her up, and set her upon a chair in the bar.
The deceased was helplessly drunk, but she managed to walk with her support, and to totter over the
threshold  separating  the  cellar  from  the  bar.  Afterwards  she fetched Mrs Beane, the charwoman,
because she thought Mrs Flowers required help; but when they got back to the Ship they found the
house closed. On tapping at the window, Flowers opened his bedroom window and said Mrs Flower
was in bed. There was a light in the bedroom. In cross-examination, witness said Flowers asked her to
pick his wife up. The deceased often got drunk, and used to fall about and get bruises.
Alfred Francis, engine diver, Beccles, said he knew the deceased well. He saw the prisoner about five
minutes to six on Tuesday night. He lived next door, but he heard no unusual sound during the night.
The next morning, when he went to call Flowers at ten minutes to six, as was his custom, Flowers was
up, and said to him as he was going past. "Stop Francis; there's a rare bad job happened. The poor old
gal is dead, and lay in the bar." The witness went into the bar, and there saw the deceased lying on
the floor, her head near the cellar threshold, and her feet close to a little round table. She had evidently
been dead some hours. He told Flowers not to meddle with her, and sent his children for the doctor
and the police. He had occasionally heard deceased and the prisoner quarrelling, but he never saw
any blows struck.
Harriet Beane, charwoman to the deceased for eleven years, said that on Tuesday night about 6.30
Hannah Willingham and Alice Francis came and told her to go down to the Ship, as they believed Mrs
Flowers was dead. She went down, but could not get into the house, and Flowers told hr his wife was
in bed. She had often heard them quarrel, but only once saw her strike at her.
Hannah Willingham, recalled, said she thought Mrs Flowers was dead when she left her, as she fell
back in the chair with her eyes and mouth wide open.

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
18 
 
 

Mr EB Crowfoot repeated the evidence he had give before the Coroner, detailing the results of the
external and post mortem examinations he had made. He found a large bruise on the left side, one on
the left thigh, and another on the right thigh. There were also bruises under the eyes, all of which
appeared to be recent. On a post mortem examination he detected a fracture of ten ribs on the left side
and eight on the right. The heart presented signs of fatty degeneration; the lungs were healthy; the
liver was softer and more friable than it is in a state of health; the stomach, spleen, and right kidney
were healthy, but the left kidney was undergoing fatty degeneration. He found about 3ozs. of serous
liquid in the arachnoid cavity of the brain, and the cortical surface of both hemispheres were covered
with a layer of coagulated lymph. He was of opinion that death was caused from shock consequent on
the injuries to the ribs, which could only have been caused by extreme violence, and  
mere fall.
In cross-examination the witness said he noticed no disarrangement of the clothes nor any appearance
of a struggle. The fatty degeneration of the heart might have caused death, and it was very likely that
the serous fluid on the brain might cause death, coupled with a fall. Deceased was a person peculiarly
liable, from the condition of the brain, to a fit of serous apoplexy. All the injuries might have been
caused by a fall, except the fractured ribs; and the position in which deceased lay when he saw her
was quite consistent with the theory that she fell from a chair in a fit.
By the Chairman - Violent pressure upon the chest would account for the fracture of the ribs.
John Fletcher, groom, said he was in the Ship Inn with Francis on Tuesday night, about six o'clock,
and heard a sort of groaning noise in the bar. Flowers told him "My old woman has been drinking
again. She is a high-mettled old woman and will have her own way." The next morning he saw Flowers,
who said, "This is a very bad job that has happened." And in reply to a remark about his early closing,
said, "I thought it would look very bad for anyone to come in and see my wife in that state." Flowers
was the worse for drink on Tuesday night, but not drunk.
Alice Francis, aged 11, said she went to the prisoner's house on Tuesday evening, about five minutes
past  five,  when  she  saw  the  deceased lying in the cellar. She was frightened, and went and told
Hannah Willingham. About a quarter past six they went in, and Wi8llingham picked Mrs Flowers up
and sat her in the chair in the bar. When she was set up in the chair her head fell back, and her mouth
and eyes were wide open. Afterwards they went for Mrs Beane, because they thought Mrs Flowers
was dying.
No further evidence was offered, and the prisoner was remanded till Tuesday.
LICENCES:  Ship to William Bell.
PUBLIC HOUSE Assessments: Appeals made by Morse & Wood, brewers, Lowestoft, against  Rates
charged. The Ship raised to 30 p.a: Bell the occupier. appeal failed.  
BECCLES BRIDGE: Meeting of Beccles Navigation Committee. A temporary bridge capable of carrying
five  tons  would  be  built  by  1  April  1884.  The  new  bridge  should  be  ready  by  1  August  1884.
Compensation should be considered for the Hermitage & the Ship yards. It was thought the pubs
woud greatly benefit from trade and lodging those concerned with the bridge. Tenders were to be
invited for the work.
POLICE COURT: LICENCES: Black Boy, Blyburgate to William Bell from the Ship
Ship, Bridge Street to George Baldry
DEATH: Mr. Samuel Sutton, landlord of the Ship Inn, Bridge Street, found dead in bed. Deceased was
in his 57th year.
WALKING INTO RIVER: A man in the darkness walked into the river near the Ship instead of going
over the bridge. He narrowly escaped drowning.

not from a
 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
1880
1882

 
East Suff Gaz 16 Nov 
Beccls Paper, 8 Aug 
1883
East Suff Gaz 30 Oct 

1885
 
1902

East Suff Gaz 24 Nov 
 
Almanack 30 May 
1916
East Suff Gaz 19 Sep 

 BRIDGE STREET 12: THE SHIP
1841
1851
1861
1871
1881

Farr, Thomas 
Farr, FW 
Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 

Darby, William 
Balls, Thomas 
Holmes, James 
Flowers, James 
Bell, Wm

8-10
15-15s
15- 10s
17- 10s

17-10s
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
19 

1896
1904

Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 

Sutton, Saul 
Woolner, Arthur

36

BRIDGE STREET 14:
1861
1871
1881
1896
1904

Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 
Morse, Fred 

Darby, Robert 
Lodge, William 
Francis, Alf 
Mills, John 
Remblants, Wm 

4
5
5
5
5-10s

CENSUS 1881

1023
1024

Br 
Br 

Dwelling:
William BELL 

Bridge St (Ship Inn)




 
 

37 
37 
20 
10 
14 





Exning, Suffolk, England 
Bedham, Norfolk, England 
Enfield, Hertford, England 
Bungay ((Beccles)), Suffolk 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 

Head 
Wife
Lodger
Lodger
Serv 

Licensed Victualler

1025
1026
1027
1028

Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 

Hannah BELL 
George BALDRY 
Jemima MANNING
Eliza E. CLARKE 
Serv

General Lab
Scholar
General

Domestic
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
20 
BRIDGE STREET:  THE HERMITAGE

1559
1559
1560
1561
1574
1580c
 

Bec Manor Accs 

For the Hermitage
The Hermitage standing void, for it is in such decay that no man dare dwell therein   0  13s
For the Hermitage
For the Hermitage
For the Hermitage decayed
STATEMENT of claim against Mr Rede by the inhabitants:-
There is an Almshouse called the Hermitage whereof the town has been possessed time out of mind
for the releaving the poor, and we have five deeds of it in writing making mention, which came to the
hands of Mr Billingford, and as we understand, Mr Rede has gotten them, and he has of late entered
the house with force, and so keeps it. Sir Thomas Gresham claimed it heretofore, and when he heard
the matter, he ceased his claim. We require that Mr Rede, may yield us the quiet possession thereof
again
received of the Widow Gorbould for one full year’s farm [a fixed yearly amount payable as rent etc]
of the church house 
paid for glassing of the windows of the church house by the Bridge 
paid for one chalder of lime for the chimney in ye said house 
paid for hundred of brick for the said chimney
paid for two loads of lime for the said chimney
paid for a bushel of hair 
paid for the mason for his work done on the said chimney 
paid to Robard’s man for the lord’s rent for the said Church House for the Manor of Beccles    2s
paid to Mr Robarde for the Lord’s Rent for the decayed tenement by the Bridge for the Manor of Rose
Hall 
Received of the Widow Godbold for half a year’s rent due the last year
Of Ayleward for the piece of ground at the Bridge 
To the Lord’s Bailiff for Rent of Hermitage 
To Austin the Thatcher for Thatching the House at the Bridge
To a mason for work done about that House
To him for glass & work done about the House at the Bridge 
For Thatch for the House on the Bridge 
For broachwands & bindings 
For the charges of a suit against the Widow Godbold for half a year’s Rent of the House at the Bridge

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
  0  13s   4d
Bec Manor Accs 

4d
4d
4d
4d

Bec Manor Accs 

 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

  0  13s
  0  13s
  0  13s

Bec Manor Accs 
Bec Manor Accs 
Beccles Fen papers 
 

1625 
 
1625 
1625 
1625 
1625 
1625 
1625 
1625 
1625 

Chchwdns’ Charge 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

11s
3s
6s 
9s
20s
 
7s

 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
Chchwdns’ Disch 

 
 
 
 
 

6d
Chchwdns’ Disch 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Chchwdns’ Disch 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
 
2d
Chchwdns’ Disch 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
2s
2s
10s 
4s 
12s 
8s
 

 4d
20s

1631
1631
1631
1631 
1631 
1631 
1631 
1631 
1631 

Chchwdns’ Charge 
Chchwdns’ Charge 

 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
Chchwdns’ Disch 

6d
6d
6d

Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
Chchwdns’ Disch 

 
 

 
 

Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
10d
Chchwdns’ Disch 

 
For timber to mend the House at the Bridge & to Spendlove for his work & for rails 3s 
Of Boyce for a quarter Rent of the House at the Bridge
Of him for a quarter’s Rent at or Lady Day last
There isa judgement and at wed against the Widow Godbold of 28s 6d for
half a year’s Rent and charges about the House at the Bridge 
And laid out by me Roger Ward more than is in the Account for lime and  mason’s work about the
House at the Bridge 
Received of John Sweetall for the rent of the house belonging to Beccles Church called the Hermitage
for Lord's rent 2s and for 16 years, that is to say for 9 years due at Michaelmas 1648 and for 7 years
hence  
Received of John Sweetle [d ? 1662 or 1673] for 2 years rent for Church House        
Item I Received of John Sweetall: Twenty Shillings 
Recd of William Bendy for rent of Hermitage (one year)            
Paid for monthly taxes for the Hermitage House 
Paid for monthly taxes for the Hermitage House & Edmund Artis his Land1s 
Received of William Bendy a year’s Rent for the Hermitage House 
Of Thomas Rouse due at st Michael’s for half a year rent for the Hermitage
Of Thomas Rouse [d 1684 or 1711] due at St Michael's for 1/2 year rent of Hermitage   
House called the Hermitage abutting on the west with the River, on the north with the common road,

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
6s  
8d

1631 
1631
1631
1631 
 
1631 

Chchwdns’ Disch 
4d
Chchwdns’ Charge 
 
 
 
10s
Chchwdns’ Charge 
Chchwdns’ Accts 
 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3s 
8d
1655
 
Chchwdns’ Charge
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
Rent 4
 1
 
7s 
10d
2

Rent 2s

1656 
1660 
1672
1673 
1674 
1674 
1674 
1680
1709

Chchwdns’ Charge 
Chchwdns’ Charge 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

Rent 2
4d

Chchwdns’ Charge 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
 
Chchwdns’ Disch 
Chchwdns’ Charge 
 
Chchwdns’ Charge 
Rent 40s
Chchwdns’ Charge 
Church Terrier 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
21 

on the east and south with John Craske [d 1722] now occupied Martin Crockett [d1721] at
A House and Land belonging to the Parish of Beccles the Rents whereof are yearly received by the
Churchwardens and expended about the repairs or Ornaments of it and other Charges belonging to
their Office Viz. Imprimis One House called the Hermitage abutting on the West with the River, on the
North with the Common Road, on the East and South with John Craske, now in the occupation of  
Robert Palmer [d 1749] at the yearly rent of  

Rent 4.
1735
Church Terrier 
 
 
 
 
         Rent 4 10s
1759
Church Leases 5 April 

Lease from Edmund Clarke, gent, & Isaac Blowers, locksmith, Churchwardens, to Robert Le Grys, in
Bridge Street for several years past hath been used as a Public House & called the Magpie late in the
occupation of Robert Miles? and now of - Miles his son or his assignees or undertenants with all and
singular, the outhouses, edifices, buildings, stable, stack yard & other yards and gardens & appurts.
for 14 years at rent of pa   [Hermitage] 
One House with a Yard called the Hermitage abutting upon the River Waveney to the West, on the
North to the Street called Bridge Street near the Bridge in Beccles, on the East and South on other  
houses, being now in the occupation of Martha Holman, Widow [d 1771] at the yearly      Rent 4 10s
 Also a House and Yard called the Hermitage late in the use or occupation of Charles Crockett and
now  of  John  Morris  situate  and being in Beccles aforesaid near the Bridge called Beccles Bridge
towards the West at  
as Income due by the Churchwardens of Beccles aforesaid, and laid out for and towards the necessary
repairs of the Parish Church of Beccles aforesaid as occasion requires.
There  is  also  a  House  and  Yard  called  the  Hermitage  now  in  the  use  and  occupation  of Henry
Knowles, situate and being in Beccles aforesaid near the Bridge called Beccles Bridge towards the
West at the yearly
which said rent is received as it becomes due by the Churchwardens of Beccles aforesaid,  for the time
being, and laid out for and towards the necessary repairs of the Parish Church of Beccles aforesaid as
Occasion requires.
A lease made to Thomas Farr of the cottage called the Hermitage and the Quay thereto belonging for
50 years from the 5th instant at ground rent of one shilling p.a., the same being in a very dilapidated
state and requiring at least 150 to be paid out repairing it including the quay. Mr Farr consenting the
said premises in a proper substantial and workmanlike manner and layout and expend not less than
150 and to leave such buildings as shall be erected for the use of the parish in proper and good repair
at the end of the tenure and also to put the quay into proper repair at his own expense and to keep and
leave it at the end of the term.
SALE; To be Sold at the Hermitage Public House Staithe by Sam Crowe: The good Wherry called
“The Wheatsheaf” burthen 25 Tons.
SALE of TIMBER: Gillingham & Beccles: R Oswald to sell 40 Oak Trees, Ash, Elm, Poplar, Willow.
Proprietor, Stephen Bartram of Beccles, who has taken the Wounded Hart Inn at St Peter’s, Norwich &
declines the Timber Trade. Part of Sale on Green near Gillingham Tollgate, the rest near Hermitage
Quay.
Samuel  Darby  agrees  to  pay  10  for  the  Hermitage  from  5  April   to 10 October and then resign
premises.
The Hermitage to be let by auction upon lease for seven years.
Stable to be built at Hermitage.
WEATHER: FLOODS: Since the Thaw set in the Gillinham land & Dam from Gillingham to Beccles
have been inundated several feet, as well as the lower part of the Town: the Hermitage & Ship pubs
being under water on ground floor several inches.
WEATHER: Heavy Rains. Marshes flooded. Hermitage & Ship flooded 2 ft.
FLOODING of MARSHES: Our whole level of Marshes having been flooded before the severe frost
set  in  &  being  consequently  an  entire  field  of  ice,  many  miles  in  extent, every facility has been
afforded for the popular & healthy amusement of skating & sliding. Several parties have come from
Lowestoft  &  proceeded  on  to Bungay, The River & Marshes have daily presented an exciting &
animated appearance. On Monday some skaters matches, under superintendence of Samuel Darby of
the Hermitage Inn took place for various prizes. Nine started for the first match & six for the second
winners of Barker & K Hopson. Afterwards 14 lads started for a purse contributed by Mr Darby, who
made a large fire of blocks etc upon them many persons fell through, but escaped with only a cold

 
 
4-10-0
1763
Church Terrier 
1784
Church Terrier 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rent 5
 
 
1801
Church Terrier 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Rent  5 5s
 
 
1802
 
Vestry Minutes
1815
Nor Merc 22 Feb 
1846 
Norfolk News 25 Jul 
1852
 
Vestry Minutes

1852
1853
1853 

 
 

Vestry Minutes
Vestry Minutes
Norwich Mercury 10 Mar

1853 
1855 

Norwich Mercury 23 Apr
Norwich Mercury 17 Feb
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
22 

water bath & the raillery of their companions.
The  Wherry  men  who  usually  ply  upon  the  Waveney  having  been  thrown  completely  out  of
employment made an appeal to the Public on Saturday last & obtained by personal Canvass nearly 7.
A subscription headed by Mayor John Crisp of the Corporation to relieve prevailing distress among
the Working Classes, expended 75 in Coals & 50 in flour & Groceries.
INQUEST at “Harbour End” Beer House on William Pye, aged 48, broom maker of Fritton. Samuel
Darby said that at 6 pm Pye came into the Hermitage - worse for liquor - but did not drink much. My
man Knights helped him into his cart & my boy led the horse to the Bridge - but he then turned to
come up the street. Rebecca Neech of Fen Lane saw him between 8pm & 9 pm driving very fast round
the Corner and heard the Horse & Cart plunge into the Corporation Basin. He was found dead under
the cart.
RESTORATION OF THE PARISH CHURCH:
Money  from  letting  the  Hermitage  to  go  to  Restoration  Committee,  WE  Crowfoot’s  proposed
amendment.
SALE: Lease for 21 Years: the Hermitage with large Wharf adjoining. Free Public House.
CHURCH LETTING: of Hermitage provided 310 for restoration funds. Let to Mr Cuddon of Bungay.
SALE of Lease not allowed by Charity Commissioners. At first lease sold for 21 years. Let for 10 years
at 30 p.a. to Mr R Thornton.
The Staithe in the occupation of John Crisp, junior re-let for 1 year to John Crisp, junior for 3
Dinner  for  Mr  Thornton  [who  owned  the  Brewery  next  door  to the Hermitage]. 35 Tradesmen in
Hermitage Inn. Praised him as he spent his money amongst them & alleviated distress.
DEATH:  On the 13th April, at Beccles, aged 79 years, Mr Richard DARBY, formerly landlord of the
Hermitage Inn, in that place.
VESTRY MEETING: “Hermitage” balance of 29. “Poor’s Pightle” & “The Staithe” 1 & 2;
Robert Kent of the Hermitage refutes allegations that his family has smallpox.
LICENSING: These were given leave to open at 5.30 am instead of 6 am: Robert Mills (Falcon); John
Green (beer house Hungate); Charles Howlett (Refreshment Rooms, Blyburgate); William Baldry (the
Bell);  James  Cutler  (Queen’s  Head);  William  Woolner  (Queen’s  Arms);  Nathaniel  Blyth  (Crown,
Blyburgate); Philip Jermy (Fox & Hounds); Robert Kent (Hermitage); Jeremiah Brooks (Fleece); Alfred
Grice (George & Dragon); Edward Bailey (Duke) - all granted
VESTRY MEETING:
Church Properties: Poor’s Pightel, Hermitage Inn, Clerk’s Piece & the Staithe on the North side of the
Bridge. To be let by auction. TM Read & Co given notice to quit the Hermitage.
LET BY AUCTION by Mr Fenn:
LOT 1:The Hermitage Inn with suitable Outbuildings & spacious Wharf, now occupied by the Beccles
Brewery Co
[Let to Beccles Brewery Co for 67 pa - previously since 1869 it was only 30]
LICENCES:  Temporary  Transfer:  Royal  Oak  to  Robert  Rayner;    White  Swan  to  Thomas  Wright;
Hermitage to John Darby; Ship to William Bell.
BREWERY: Employees of Messrs Harwood & Beaman’s Brewery dined at the Hermitage Inn, Mr &
Mrs John Darby catering. 26 sat down to dinner, Mr Hallam, foreman in the Chair. After supper joined
by Samuel Darby.
MESSRS DARBY’S BRICKMAKERS upwards of 20 sat down to an excellent dinner provided by the
Hermitage Inn.
BECCLES BRIDGE: Meeting of Beccles Navigation Committee. A temporary bridge capable of carrying
five  tons  would  be  built  by  1  April  1884.  The  new  bridge  should  be  ready  by  1  August  1884.
Compensation should be considered for the Hermitage & the Ship yards. It was thought the pubs
woud greatly benefit from trade and lodging those concerned with the bridge. Tenders were to be
invited for the work.
TO BE LET by AUCTION by H & J Read [the Church Lands] on leases of 10 years.
LOT 1 THE HERMITAGE, Bridge Street. A Free Public House with outbuildings, now occupied by
Messrs AF Evans, or their undertenants
[8 November: Let at 34 pa]
LEASE for 10 years; occupied by AF Evans & Co.
LEASE for 10 years: The Staithe on the NORTH side of Beccles Bridge, late Samuel Darby

 
 
 
 
1859
Beccles Wkly Nws 8 Mar 

1859
 

 Beccles Wkly Nws 22 Mar
 

1859
1859
1859

Beccles Paper 22 Mar 
Beccles Wkly Nws 12 Apr
Beccles Paper 20 Sept 

 
1862

 
Beccles Paper 11 Mar 
1865
Beccles Wkly 18Apr 

1866
1872
1872

Beccles Wkly 3Apr 
Beccles Paper 16 Jul 
East Suff Gaz 1 Oct 

1877
 

East Suff Gaz 27 Mar 
 

1877
 

East Suff Gaz, 14 Aug 
 

 
1880

 
East Suff Gaz 16 Nov 
1882
Beccls Paper,31 Jan 
1883
East Suff Gaz 16 Jan 
1883
East Suff Gaz 30 Oct 

1887
 

East Suff Gaz 1 Nov 
 

 
1887
1887

 
Beccles Paper 7 Nov 
Beccles Paper 7 Nov 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
23 

1901
1907

ADVERTISEMENT: Hermitage Inn: EH Hockey; Good Accommodation for riverside lodgings.
VISITORS’  LIST: Places: Alexandra Road (2); “The Hermitage”, Bridge Street (3); Waveney Hotel,
Northgate (10);  Suffolk Boarding House, Station Road  (6); King’s Head, New Market (7)
ADVERTISEMENT: Hermitage Mineral Water Works, Bridge Street (Ward’s)
*** THE GREAT FLOOD: Full page Article with 4 Photographs of the Great Flood, 4 feet rise in 36
hours (including the Hermitage)
CHURCH PAROCHIAL COUNCIL: Proposal to sell the Hermitage in Bridge Street for 275, (which
was considered a good price) by AE Bunn, Hon Sec supported by Churchwarden Palmer & S White.
One dissenting voice, FT Peachey who said that there were none too many relics of the past remaining
in  the  town,  and  what  few  there  were  ought  not  to  be  too  readily  disposed  of.  Not  seconded.
Resolution passed. - The occupant  John Wilson.

East Suff Gaz 20 Aug 
East Suff Gaz 6 Aug 

1908
1912

East Suff Gaz 15 Dec 
East Suff Gaz 3 Sep 
1926
East Suff Gaz 1 Feb 
CENSUS 1881

1007
1008

Br 
Br 

Dwelling:
John DARBY 

Bridge St (Hermitage Inn)



52 
61 
18 



Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Mendham, Norfolk, England
North Cove, Suffolk, England

Head 
Wife
Serv 

Licensed Victualler

1009
1010

Br 
Br 

Hannah DARBY 
Alice BARBER 
Serv)

General
(Domestic

OCCUPANTS:
1630   
1631   
1655   
1672    
1671   
1680   
1694   
1709   
1735   
1740   
1756   
1760   
1765   
1775   
1784   
1793   
1801   
1814   
1820   
1824   
1828   
1841   
1851   
1861   
1871   
1881   
1896   
1901  
1904   
1907
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Widow Godbold,  
Boyse,
John Sweetall  
 
Anne Rouse, widow
Thomas Rouse  
Anne Rouse, widow
Martin Crockett
Robert Palmer
Robert Palmer
Robert Miles      
Robert Miles      
Martha Holman      
Charles Crockett   
John Morris       
William Tripp
Henry Knowles
Thomas Neech
James Hall        
George Piper     
Richard Darby d 1865 
Richard Darby  
Samuel Darby  
Read     
Robert Kent      
John Darby       
John Darby       
 
Holsey Dedman     
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

Rent 20s half year
Rent 20s for half year
Rent 2 pa
 

 
 

 
William Bendy  

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adnams & Co              
 
 Adnams surrender lease.
 
 
 

Rent 2 pa

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Rent 40s half year

 
 

 
 
 
Poor Rate 3

Poor Rate 3
Poor Rate 3
Poor Rate 3

 
 
 

Poor Rate 4
Poor Rate 4
Poor Rate 5-6-8
Poor Rate 5-6-8
Rates 10
Rates 9-10s
Rates 17-10  
Rates 17-10  
Rates 30     
Rates 30     
Rates 34
Rates 39     
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

12-13
Cheque from compensation committee 400
Half Year's Rent        8      
Legal & Valuation              17-18-6
Repairs & alterations          61-5-10

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
Compensation for investment        320
 

 

 
 

1908  
 
Interest and Rent   18-7-0
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
24 

1909  
1912                       
1913              
1915             
1916  
1920  
1922  
1924  

 

 
 
 
 
John Wilson
John Wilson
John Wilson
John Wilson

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 

 
22-5-0
 
 

Rent 16 & interest 10-7-0

interest 12-16-3
Rent     13-10-8

 
 
 
 

Suckling 1846:
 

 

There was formerly a hermitage and a chapel attached to it, at the foot of this bridge, dedicated to St
Mary,  wherein  an  anchorite,  who subsisted by the contributions of passengers, performed divine
service. The erection of small chapels on or near the foot of ancient bridges was very frequent in early
times, and the most beautiful specimen existing, or perhaps that was erected of its kind, is that on
Wakefield bridge, built about the time of Edward III.Of the style or elegance of this at Beccles it is now
impossible to speak, but it seems to have been rebuilt in the year 1500, when we meet with a legacy "to
the new chapel of St Mary:" and in 1523, William Best, by will, gives to the chapel at the bridge xx d.
The site of this little establishment is pointed out by a modern public house called the Hermitage, and
is the property of  St. Michael's church, its rents being appropriated to the repairs of the fabric. These
are  at  present  almost  nominal:  a  lease  of  the  premises  having been granted some years since to
Thomas Farr, Esq., who covenanted to erect a substantial house thereon. The full value of the estate
will revert to the use of the church in 1852.

 
 
Beccle, Streets, Bridge Street  . 
David Lindley, June 2001 
25 
BRIDGE STREET

1879
 
 

Beccles Paper 5 Sept 

SALE: Lot 2:  Six Cottages at the Junction of Bridge Street & Northgate.
Occupied by J Mills, A Ward, B Bird, R Brady, W Algar,   D Ward [Fen Lane, East side]

 
 

1004
1005

Br 
Br 

Dwelling:
James BUTCHER 

Bridge St
59 
Saxmundham, Suffolk, England 
Head 
Horse

Trainer (Huntsman)
Phoebe BUTCHER
Dwelling:

1006
1011

Br 
Br 


Bridge St

56 
Walpole, Suffolk, England 
Wife

1012
1013
1014
1015
1016
1017

Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 

Wilm MIRRINGTON
Sarah MIRRINGTON
Grace MIRRINGTON
Ernest MIRRINGTON 
HorceMIRRINGTON
Dwelling:



 

29 
32 

 
3 m 





Glemsford, Suffolk, England
Dickleburgh, Norfolk, England
Fish Needham, Norfolk, England 

Fish Needham, Norfolk, England 

Head 
Wife

Corn Merchants Clerk

Daur
East Harling, Norfolk, England 

Son

 
Bridge St

Son
1018
Br 

Alfred FRANCIS 
(Railway)
Alice FRANCIS 
Wesley FRANCIS 
Han WILLINGHAM

50 
Hepworth, Suffolk, England
Head 
Engine
Driver

1019
1020
1021

Br 
Br 
Br 

 
 

11 
10 
20 



Hunnington, Suffolk, England
Foxhall, Suffolk, England 
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England 

Daur 
Son 

Scholar
Scholar
Boarder

Housekeeper
Walt WILLINGHAM
Dwelling:

1022
1029

Br 
Br 


Bridge St

20 
Bury St Edmunds, Suffolk, England 
Boarder
General Lab
1030
Br 

George H. TOLL 
Men (Corn)
Ann TOLL
Charles TOLL 
Elizabeth BAKER 
Susan BAKER 

65 
Keswick, Norfolk, England 
Head 
Miller   Employing   2

1031
1032
1033
1034

Br 
Br 
Br 
Br 

 




64 
32 
58 
50 




Mildenhall, Suffolk, England
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Castle Acre, Norfolk, England
Hallesdon, Norfolk, England

Wife 
Son 
Lodger
Lodger

Handicap: Imbecile
Miller
Housekeeper
No Occupation