Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
1
BECCLES COMMON.

from Notes on Beccles Fen by SW Rix in the Lowestoft Record Office
On the 10 May 1451 the Abbot  granted the Fen to the inhabitants of Beccles for ever, allowing them free use of  rushes &
sedge  at a yearly rent of  6-13-4
From that time the Fen and  manor became separate one from the  other.
The inhabitants were not yet legally incorporated, in other words they had not received a Royal Charter. But a Grant had been
made to some of them by name as members of the 24s & 48s. This was the town council in late 15C & early 16C when there were
only 300 or 400 families in the town. They made the Regulations for the Fen until 1539.
In November 1539 Henry VIII took over Bury Abbey. He also took over Beccles Fen & Common.
The chief man in the town was William Rede
"one specially beloved & trusted, that did give great alms to the poor and did bestow good sums of money in mending of
highways about & near the town."  He was an elderly man.
William Reed was given the job of buying the fen from the king. The funds came from:
 
 
 
 
 
All of these were to be sold. Altogether William Rede had a total of 300 - 400 from the town at his disposal.
"Merchant Rede, with the Abbot's grant and the money in his saddle bag , took horse for London. He had his instructions, - to
buy the Fen, on the best terms he could, and obtain the land for the town, which had become so essential for its prosperity.  At
the same time William Rede I's younger son William II was attempting to purchase the manor of Beccles, but was told he should
not try to buy the manor until his father had obtained the Fen.
William Rede I
money, and was  willing to pay off 6 of the rent of 6-13-4 at 20 years purchase (which is what the Court of Augumentations
was asking), or 120 - leaving 13s-4d as a perpetual ground rent to the Crown. - William Rede I was given the Grant.
From the 350 or more  at his disposal Rede had paid 120 & his expenses. He appeared to have pocketed the rest.
This was the cause of contention between the townspeople and the Redes for the next 50 years

I, a mercer and merchant,  "a man of worship", a justice of the Peace for Suffolk,

1. A certain amount of money from the people of the town
2. A house & land at Blofield, Norfolk belonging to the Gild of St Michael in Beccles - he was the sole surviving
trustee.
3 A flock of sheep at Blofield
4 Silver Plate belonging to the Guild of St Michael & some church plate.

- said the inhabitants were very poor (the record piteously adds "as indeed they were.”), but that HE had  

1. 
2. 
 
3. 
4. 

At last the Charter arrived, sealed by Queen Elizabeth on the 2nd of July 1584.
Two orders or companies were to be constituted - not as before of  24s & 48s - but one body to consist of the 12
chiefest and discreet men of the town and the other of 24 "honest & meet persons".
The could own a Council House to be called the Guildhall
The Corporation was to make regulations for the Fen.

1836
1860?

Beccles Council 5 Aug 

COTTAGE  for MARSHMAN to be built for 80
WILTON RIX WRITING in 1860s?  “Mr Abraham Clarke tells me that he could just remember some
Lincolnshire Militia, in his childhood having a few tents on the south east side of what is now called
Boney’s  Island  in  consequence  of  some  of  the  men  being  afflicted  with  smallpox or some other
contagious disease.
Mr Clarke says that before the peace of 1814 the uneven ground, then unenclosed, now known as
Boney’s Island was usually called “The Hill”. It acquired its present name from the bonfire made there
at the Peace Festival in that year.
The hard Common - as  distinguished from the Fen or Marsh was known as the Hill or higher ground.
Boney’s Island: It has almost invariably happened that the Plantation on the Common, to which the
Public are allowed access in the Winter has been ‘banned & barred’ to the Town for some weeks in
Spring when a walk round its shady avenues would be most enjoyable
TO BE LET: A Cottage & 11 acres of Land near Beccles Common. Apply Mr Newson at King’s Head
on Friday 18 August
AGRICULTURAL SHOW: First visit in its 41 year history. Men of town and neighbourhood came up
with subscriptions and special prizes. Supplemented by Horticultural & Poultry Shows.
Show given contributions of 450: 100 from Council; 10 gns from John Crisp; 10 each from Gurney,
Lacon, Garrod Bros, Thornton etc. & others 5.
Samuel Darby erected required shedding for 84 & built grandstand by the horsering. (he paid 2 for
the right)

Rix Geographical p 244 
 
 

 
1871

 
Beccles Paper 27 Jun 
1871
Beccles Paper 8 Aug 
1871
Beccles Paper, Jul 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
2
 
 

Agricultural  Show  held  on  the  Common.  In  the  centre  of  which  is  a plantation [Boney’s Island]
covering  several acres, which is intersected with neat gravel paths and forms an agreeable promenade
in the summer, This is on the north side of the Show. Approached by gravel walk a quarter of a mile
long with handsome gates and palisading at each end. On either side there is a neat edging of grass
and a well-kept flower bed planted with trees, flowers and shrubs. A large dyke in which are a number
of fine swans, intersects the path at about two thirds of its length and is crossed by an iron bridge. At
the entrance is a pretty octagonal arbour and two others of different shape at the end.
On  a  passenger  alighting  at  the  Railway  Station  a  few yards brought him to the entrance to the
Avenue, where a hut was erected for the purpose of taking tickets.
From the entrance he appearance was picturesque and animated. On the right, on a piece of level
meadow land, were the beautiful marquees in which the Horticultural and Poultry Shows were held,
with flags floating gaily in the breeze from their summits. Looking beyond the broad Avenue, with a
row  of  flags  on  either  side,  were  long  rows  of  shedding  standing  out  in  bold  relief  from  the
umbrageous  background  of the plantation, with the neater tents for the judges and secretary and
refreshment booths towering above.
There  was  a  shed  for  cattle  90  ft  long,  next  to this the 32 lb cannon of the 4th Suffolk Artillery
Volunteers, from which floated a large Royal Standard. Another double row of shedding with stalls for
bullocks, riding horses and cattle 270 ft long. At the back pens for sheep and pigs 360 ft long, a water
tank and a few more stalls for the bullocks
The stalls for riding horses, at the upper end of the ground, a single row of stalls 260 ft, a double row
230 ft and another single row of 220 ft. Near the centre of the ground were refreshment booths and
ladies’  cloaks.  Refreshments  by  Messrs  Snowden, Beccles. In the centre the Riding Horsering 40
yards by 120 yards with a grandstand for 600 people at prices of 1 or 2 shillings. There were hurdles
and water jumps of 12 ft. and a platform for the Band near the centre.
On  the  left:  stalls  for  agricultural  horses  450  ft  by  250  ft,  and  carriages  and  heavier  agricultural
implements.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

1873 
 
 
 
 
 
1873

14th SUFFOLK RIFLE VOLUNTEERS: Inspection by Lt-Col Leathes. Capt Crowfoot away, Lieut
 
 
 
exercises were gone through; then followed several Company movements, the whole concluding with  
skirmishing.

Beccles Paper, 1 Jul 

Read, sick. Lieut GB Angell in command. 70 men paraded at 6.30pm. The Corps headed by its band,  
marched to the Common, ranks were opened and minute inspection of arms, accoutrements, etc. The  
Corps marched past in quick and double time, line was formed, and the manual, firing, and bayonet

 
 

Beccles Paper 1 Jul 

THE HORSE SHOW: A ring is to be erected for judging the Trotting 420ft x 240ft. The shedding is
3000ft in length. A new feature is the engagement of two professional Lady Riders - one took first
prize for riding at Alexandre Park Horse Show last week.
THE HORSE SHOW: The stalls in which the horses are to be placed erected in the form of a square &
are all covered with canvas. Accommodation for: 30 stallions, 50 hunters, 54 hackneys & roadsters, 21
cobs, 35 ponies, 50 agricultural horses, 20 horses in harness, 16 for trotting & 26 for jumping. Inside
the enclosure a horse ring - an ellipse of 200ft in circumference, where trotting & jumping trials will
take place. At the side of the ring a Grandstand 300ft long to accommodate 1000 people. 20 Classes;
prizes  ranging  from  20  to  4  &  prizes  for  jumping,  trotting  etc.  Tents  for  refreshment6  at  the
Hortcultural Show. Many Entries. Band of 33rd (Duke of Wellington’s Own) Regiment. Will end with
Firework Display.
On Second Day a Sale of Horses by George Fenn. 100 entries.
THE HORSE SHOW: Took place on 23 & 24 July. Good hot weather - high praise. Fire Works each
night.

1873
Beccles Paper 22 Jul 

 
1873

 
Beccles Paper 29 Jul 

1879 
 
 
 
1883

Beccles Paper, 17 Jun 

RIFLE CORPS DRILL. 250 men of Beccles, Lowestoft & Bungay met for united drill at 7pm on  
 
men caught the 8.35 train back, the Bungay men an hour later. Refreshment in the Britannia Shades  
[Blyburgate]  provided by Mr Wright

Beccles Common. Major Crowfoot put the men through the manual & platoon exercises. Lowestoft  
East Suff Gaz 24 Apr 

TOWN COUNCIL i) Attention of Major Crowfoot drawn to the want of repair of the rifle stands on the
Common.
ii) Alderman Masters complained about the state of the Common. It should be a place of recreation,
but the sweeping of the streets and the night soil were carted there and created a great nuisance. The
same concerned the holes on the Common, which ought to be filled up as much as possible, and some

 
 
 
Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
3

effort to make it look more like a park. At present it was the receptacle for the rubbish of the town.
Reply: The Common was little else but holes; but the holes made for getting out gravel must be filled
up. Councillor Read said that only a short time ago he had the misfortune to lose a cow owing to its
falling into one of those holes. Not long after he saw two ponies galloping in play, and one of them
COUNCIL:  Why had the Rifle Range on the Common not been used for practice as it had been for the
last 30 years? Unfortunately the artillery had been allowed to use the range and had killed a horse
belonging to Sir Charles Clarke’s tenant, Mr Ross. He was reimbursed for the loss of the horse, but he
considered it insufficient. Sir Charles would not allow the range to be used unless the War Office
indemnified him, which they would not do. It was agreed that a letter should be sent  to Sir Charles.

1895 Beccles Paper 12 Nov 

1896 
 
 
1899 
 
1899 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1911
 

Beccles Paper 19 May 

ROOK SHOOTING: Between 30 and 40 guns employed on the annual Rook Shoot on Buonaparte’s
 
shot. the party afterwards had a liberal spread in one of the outbuildings prepared by the Mayoress.

 
 

Island on the COMMON. The shoot continued for two hours but comparatively few rooks were  

GOLF CLUB: It is proposed to form a Golf Club on the Common without interference with any  
other sport there.

Beccles Paper 12 Sep 
 

PROPOSED GOLF CLUB: Meeting with the Mayor in the Chair.. They would start with a
membership of between 50 and 60. He already had promises from 38 men and 14 ladies.
Subscriptions & entrance fees would amount to 70. The ground would cost about 30 to lay out.
The Yarmouth professional had been over to inspect the Common, and thought that a very nice nine  
hole course could be laid out. It would in no way interfere with any other sport. Col Dunnage elected  
President. Vice Presidents: NH Bacon, JE Crisp, WCK Clowes, WM Crowfoot & EJ Poyser. Also
WA Clowes be asked to accept captaincy. CT Clarkson to be Hon Sec. The Committee: JP  
Larkman, TP Angell, TW Woodroffe, W Ayrton, FW Robinson, FF Garrood & JR Crisp. In reply to  
Col Wilson, it was understood that the whole working of the club should be left to the Committee.
The Committee was authorised to select plans for a suitable Club House. About 200 would be  
needed for that. The raising of the funds was agreed in the form of 1 shares bearing 4% interest.

 
Beccles Paper 10 Oct 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

East Suff Gaz 3 Jan 

REVIEW OF THE YEAR 1910: .
The reopening of the Rifle Range on the Common was not approved by Inspectors because it was too
dangerous.
The Council agreed to let a Marsh neighbouring the Common  to the Sanders Aeroplane Factory with
permission  o  build  a  shed  in  which  a  flying  machine  with  up-to-date  improvements  has  been
constructed.  It  would  be  very  gratifying  if  the  success  anticipated  were  attained,  and  a  new
flourishing industry were established in the town.

 
 
 

1914 
1914 
 
 
 
1917 
 
 
1917 
 
 
1917 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Beccles Paper 28 Apr 
COUNCIL: Public to be allowed to use the Island on the Common for picknicks & walking.

SALE of unsold portions of WORLINGHAM ESTATE: 11 farms & 1,448 acres.
 
 
Common Farm with house & nearly 13 acres of pasture land, Mr Soanes (the tenant) 280;

Beccles Paper 8 Sep 

 
180; Hoffman brick kiln, Kiln Farm, 2 cottages, farmhouse, 50 acres, Mr TJ Self 1,150; The  

Castle Farm 176a 2r 20p, farmhouse & 2 Cottages, Mr Holt 3,350; Arable Field, 9a 31 p, Mr Ward
 

BURNING FURZE ON COMMON: 5 boys charged with setting fire to gorse on the Common. Said
they were told to do it  by Adams, the links keeper. The common was to have potatoes planted on it.  
Fined 2s 6d each.

Beccles Paper 6 Feb 

 
 

Beccles Paper 21 Aug 

CORPORATION’S POSSESSIONS: The Fen, the Gildhall, the Public Hall, 21 & 23 Grove Road,  
the cottage and premises on the Plantation on the Common; the Bathing Place and cottage in  

 
Puddingmoor.

 

YMCA IN BECCLES: Since May 1917 the YMCA has run two centres, one on the Common, with
 
Worlingham Hut was opened in April of this year, and is of attractive design and well equipped,
costing altogether (with furnishings) 900. It is open from 10am to 9.30pm. Concerts are arranged
weekly.. There are lantern and other lectures, and the Red Triangle Library of 500 volumes. Huge
quantities of writing paper, envelopes and postcards are given away, as well as ink, pens and blotting  
paper.
 
 
the Common, are responsible for the counter and kitchen duties.
 
 

Beccles Paper 20 Nov 
the Lovatt Scouts, and the second with the Montgomerys and Denbigh’s at Worlingham. The  
 

 
 
 

 

 
helpers, who under the able direction of Miss Nellie Pells for Worlingham, and Miss Julia Pells for

Too much cannot be said about the devotion and self-sacrifice of the voluntary lady and other  
 

 
postal orders cashed 4874.

Worlingham: Average number of men in the camp: 650. number of letters written: 61, 552; number f
Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
4

 
 
 
1917 
 
1918 
 
1918

 
 
 

 
 
 

The Common Marquee: average number of men: 700. Number of letters: 38,454.
The work begun on the Common under Mr & Mrs Benns, assisted by Miss Julia Pells & Mr Womac
Brooks is being continued in the Public Hall.

Beccles Paper 4 Dec 

ACCIDENT: A lad Clark found a detonator on the Common, took it home to Peddars Lane,  
showing it to a soldier billeted on them, when it exploded and blew off two of his fingers.

 

SALE OF TIMBER on island on the Common for 495 to Messrs Darby. 83 oaks, 17 felled pieces
of elm and poplar, 24 standing pollards on the Avenue & 2 ash

Beccles Paper 5 Feb 
 
Beccles Paper 26 Mar 

URBAN SANITARY AUTHORITY 1. Most of the trees in the Avenue had been cut down and young
trees planted. 4. The military state that they will require the use of  the Common again this summer.

1918 
 
 

LAND COMMITTEE. The YMCA asked to store their heavy equipment in the open shed adjoining
Beccles Paper 22 Oct 
 
 

Baxter’s house on the Common.
Lovat Scouts wrote with reference to buildings they were occupying in the Island. The shed now used
as a barber’s & tailor’s shop was in a state of collapse, and would not have occupied it if a charge was
to be made.
2/1st LOVAT SCOUTS thank the Council for its kindness in giving them use of the Garden on the
Common at the disposal of the troops during their stay in Beccles. They now hand the Garden back to
the Council with about 1,000 young cabbage plants growing there.1919
War Department by Tender: Summer Camp: Structures & fittings: Corrugated Iron Cookhouses, Field
Latrines, Paving Slabs, Stoneware, Drainpies etc. on BECCLES COMMON.
SWINGS: Three swings to be erected on Beccles Common, but witout enclosures, at the left side of
the entrance from the Avenue.

 
1918
Beccles Paper 10 Dec 
Beccles Paper 11 Mar 
SALE:
1932
Beccles Paper 20 Jul 
THE AVENUE
1866
Beccles Paper 24 May 

Designs invited for the Gates & a Bridge upon the new Path leading from the Railway Station to the
Common
Tenders for wire fencing 800 yards on new Avenue from Station to Common
We  notice  the  opening  of  the  Avenue  leading  to  the  Common,  a  work  of  great  expense,  on
Wednesday 1 May, the opening day.
Opening of the AVENUE on 1 May: at 5.30 the Town Council starts from the Council Chamber, headed
by Rifle Corps Band, down Station Road, across the Railway Bridge. Mayor declared it open. Council
proceeded to the Plantation known as Boney’s Island to inspect the Pathway.
Returned to Assembly Room & a substantial tea provided by Mr Shore of the White Lion. 70 people
Mr Rix spoke [as Mayor]:
“In the making the Path they had employed a number of old men who otherwise might have gone to
the Workhouse; it was surely better to employ them than let them go there.
Mr Mayhew praised Mr Fenn’s role as Town Surveyor, showing “his usual energy.”
Council purchased three swans for the ornamental water in the Avenue for 1 2s 0d
An Avenue has been made by the Corporation from the Station Road to the Common, at a cost of
between 800 and 900: it is 60 feet in width, and a quarter of a mile in length: there have been planted
elm trees for the Avenue, and likewise shrubs and flowers; the whole is enclosed with iron fencing.
There is a piece of ornamental water with swans.
COUNCIL: The huts on the Avenue to be sold at the next Marsh Letting.
LETTER: Being in Beccles for a few hours I was much attracted by the appearance of the Avenue
leading on to the Common. I was so pleased with the view that I determined to look at it a little closer
and proceeded a short distance along its course. But I had not gone far before I was compelled to
retreat. Not that the spot that I had reached was untidy or uncared for, indeed it bore traces of having
recently received particular attention. Plants and shrubs were there in profusion, and the flowers had
begun to unfold themselves and to lend their aid to render the spot particularly attractive. But the air
was filled with such a filthy odour! So horrible was it that I was obliged to run away as quickly as
possible. From enquiries I learnt that the foul ditch from which this stench springs has existed for
many years.
The ditch on the Avenue has been emptied of its filth.
The Band of the 4th Suffolk Artillery will play a selection of Music on the Avenue every Thursday
evening  commencing  7  June  at  7.30  pm.  Subscriptions  towards  defraying the expenses to Dixon,
Stationer [15 Newmarket]. Programmes 1d. Signed G. Hussey, Bandmaster.
The Avenue which was made in 1867, at a cost of 900, is sixty feet wide and a quarter of a mile  

1866
1867

Beccles Paper 4 Sep 
Beccles Paper 23 Apr 
1867
Beccles Paper 7 May 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
1868
1869

 
Beccles Paper 10 Nov 
Directory 

1873
1875

Beccles Paper 22 Apr 
Beccles Paper 11 May 

1875
1875

Beccles Paper 1 Jun 
Beccles Paper 1 June 
1899
Beccles Almanack 
Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
5
 
long.
Beccles Aeroplane of 50 years ago
from Eugene Ulph’s Scrapbook, Beccles Museum 1962-64: March 1963
 
 

By  the  death  at  Lowestoft  last  week  of  Mr.  H. A, Sanders, memories are revived at the Beccles.
aeroplane of 1911 and the gallant efforts to build a plane to fly. Mr. Sanders. began constructing his
machine at Kessingland in 1908. It was a very frail effort of wood, covered with cotton fabric, and
powered by a four-cylinder engine made for him by Messrs Brooke.
After a few hops, along the Denes, Mr. Sanders made a bold move in 1911 when he hired a marsh
adjoining Beccles Common and built a hangar and workshops. He used the Common for flight. trials.
In this, he had followed in the footsteps of another local pioneer, a gentleman named King. who had
brought his monoplane to the Common, housed it in a large tent and after several abortive attempts to
leave the ground. finally gave up when the- machine and the tent were wrecked in a gale.

 
 

CONSTANT CHANGES
 

 

 The machine Mr. Sanders brought to Beccles was a biplane of a “pusher” type, that is with engine
and twin propellers at the rear, the pilot being mounted in an open seat in the centre of the lower wing.
In those early days there was no ready made formula for  flying and modifications, were constantly
being  effected.  A  greater  amount  of  success.  attended  the  scrapping  of  the  twin  “props”  and
substituting one driven direct from the engine.
Crowds  of  people  flocked  to the; Common to watch the trials, often ending in some minor crash.
However.  each  succeeding  test  saw  the  tiny biplane airborne, if only for a few seconds. Inches.,
became feet. then yards and when an Army pilot Lieut. W. Parke, took over the controls,. success
seemed not far away.
Then came an epic evening. The aeroplane was wheeled out from its marsh hangar and taken across to
the ‘straight” leading, to the “Butts.” The engine was started. the plane moved slowly away. then
gained speed and, height to over 30 ft. Still gaining height it turned left when nearing the “Butts,
crossed over the marshes, toward, the Lowestoft line on which a train was, making for Beccles”. The
plane turned again and within seconds train and machine were level, but only momentarily, for Lt.
Parke soon gained on his rival and continued until he was over the Black Dam railway crossing.

 
 
 
 

STRUCK TREE
 

 

He then turned again to make for the Common, but the machine was losing height and in seconds had
struck a tree by the gate leading to the Common. The plane crashed  and was severely damaged, but
the  pilot  had  a  miraculous  escape  from  injury.  The  next  day  saw  a  local  newspaper proclaiming
“Aeroplane Races Lowestoft Train!”
Undaunted  Mr  Sanders  and  his  little  staff  rebuilt  the  plane  and  again  trials  proceeded,  eagerly
watched by a crowd of sightseers which at times numbered more than 2,000. Then came the eve of the
Kessingland  Flower  Show  and  an  added  attraction  was  to  be Captain Sanders’ aeroplane, which
would be flown over from Beccles the previous evening. Once again crowds flocked to the Common to
witness the take-off. On a fine, warm. summer evening the plane once again was wheeled out on to the
“straight”  and  the  engine started. Heading in the direction of the Worlingham Road. the machine
climbed  and  was  soon  over  the  rising  ground  bordering  the  road.  Its  success  was  short-lived,
however, for not  being able to clear the road the pilot was forced to bring it down on the field, happily
undamaged. It was. brought back to the Common, wheeled across dikes on planks, and next day made

 
 

a. less  spectacular journey to the flower show on a lorry!
PROJECT ABANDONED
 

 

Work continued on the Beccles aeroplane, but without much more success and finally the project was
abandoned.
When the 1914 war broke out Mr. Sanders joined the Royal Naval Air Service, during which be was
the victim of a serious accident, being struck by a propeller. In the meantime his test pilot, Lieut.,
Parke, had been killed in a flying accident, a fate unfortunately very prevalent in those early days-of
man’s effort to conquer the air.
From flying Mr Sanders turned to a much less arduous vocation, that of a smallholder, and for some
years  he  specialised  in growing flowers, at his nurseries. at Somerleyton Road, Oulton. where his
death occurred last week. He was burried in St. Margaret’s Churchyard, Lowestoft.

 
 
 
 
Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
6
Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
7
WOODVIEW FARM, BECCLES COMMON
date 
description 
 
occupant 
 
occupation 
owner
 
 
cottage
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
     3 10s

1841 
1849 
 

Beccles Common
Sale of the Earl of Gosford’s Estate in one Lot on 21 August 1851
Small Occupations: in Beccles & Worlinmham

 
James Wyatt 
 
 
 
Earl of Gosford

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

James Wyatt
298 
299 
300 
301 
 32 
 

Cottage containing sitting room, two chambers, kitchen & dairy, with yard & garden 
First Sweethall’s dole 
Middle Sweethall’s dole 
Further Sweethall’s dole 
Common Drain Marsh 
 

0a 0r 15p
 
2a 0r 16p
1a 3r  31p
5a 0r 20p
11a 1r 11p 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Total 

2a 0r  9p
 
 
16 0s 0d

1850 
1851 Census

Beccles Common
 
James Whyett 
 
 
 
Earl of Gosford

James Whyett 
Mary Whyett 


54 
50 


Shadingfield 
Kesingland 

 
 

Head 
wife

Cow keeper

1855 
1860 
1865 
1870 
1875 
1880 

Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common

 
 
 
 
 
 

James Whyatt 
James Wyatt 
James Wyatt 
James Whyett 
James Whyett 
Richards, Mary Ann 

 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Earl of Gosford
Earl of Gosford
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles

 

1881 CENSUS
Mary A. RICHARDSW 
Mary A. RICHARDSU 
Willie ROE 

48 
27 
17 



Syleham, Suffolk, England 
Syleham, Suffolk, England 
Ringsfield, Suffolk, England

Head 
Daur 
 

Agriculture Cowkeeper (Dairy Man)
Agriculture Cowkeeper Labourer

1885 
1890 
1895 
1899 
1904 
1906 Survey 
1907 
1914 
1914 
 
 
 
 
1922 
1927 
1936 
1948 
1954 
1963 
1967 
1974 

Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common
Beccles Common

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SALE of unsold portions of WORLINGHAM ESTATE: 11 farms & 1,448 acres.
Castle Farm 176a 2r 20p, farmhouse & 2 Cottages, Mr Holt 3,350;
Arable Field, 9a 31 p, Mr Ward 180;
Hoffman brick kiln, Kiln Farm, 2 cottages, farmhouse, 50 acres, Mr TJ Self 1,150;
The Common Farm with house & nearly 13 acres of pasture land, Mr Soanes (the tenant) 280;
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Richards, Mary Ann 
Richards, Mary Ann 
Richards, Mary Ann 
Soanes, Fred 
Soanes, George
Soanes, George
Soanes, George
Soanes, George

 
 
 
 
cowkeeper
 
cowkeeper
cowkeeper

 
 
 
 

Clarke, Rev Sir Charles 
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles
Clarke, Rev Sir Charles

 
 
 
 
 

 
Marsh Farm 
Common Farm 

 
Mulholland, Hon2 bed 2 recep 6 occup
Beccles Paper 8 Sep 

 
 
 
 
Common Farm 
Common Farm 
Common Farm 
Common Farm 
Woodview Farm
Woodview Farm
Wodview Farm
Woodview Farm

 
 
 
 

Soanes, George
Foreman, William
Boast, Arthur 
Daniel Baxter ?
William Hackett
William Hackett
William Hackett
William Hackett

 
 
 
 
 

cowkeeper
cowkeeper
cowkeeper
cowkeeper
farmer

Beccles, Streets, Common 
David Lindley, November 2003 
 
8
MARSHMAN’S HOUSE

1836
[1835
1841 
1845 
1850 
1851 CENSUS

Beccles Council 5 Aug 

COTTAGE  for MARSHMAN to be built for 80
THE MARSHMAN, Wigg,  allowed 8s salary for his labour on the Fenn.]
[948.3]
[ 959] 
{997] 

 
Corporation 
Baxter, Benj 
Baxter, Benj  

 

Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 

 
 
 

House
House
House

 
 
 

3
2-15s
2-15s

Baxter, Benjamin
Baxter, Hannah 
Baxter, Benjamin
Baxter, Hannah 
Baxter, Robert 
Baxter, John 
Baxter, Ruth 
Baxter, James 

49 
49 
14 
13 
11 


North Cove 
Baddingham 
Beccles
Beccles
Beccles
Beccles
Beccles
Beccles

322 
322 
322 
322 
322 
322 
322 
322 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Beccles Common

 
 
 
 
 
 

1855 
1860 
1865 
1870 
1875 
1880 
1881 CENSUS

Baxter, Benj  
Baxter, Bn  
Baxter, Benj 
Baxter, Benj  
Baxter, Benj  
Baxter, Jacob  

[1048]
[1057]
[1098]
[1381]
[1333]
[1414]

Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 

 
 
 
 
 
 

House
House
House
House
House
House 7 Bldgs 

 
 
 
 
 

4-5s
4-5s
8-10s
8-10s
8-10s
8-10s

Dwelling: 
Jacob BAXTER  M 
Elizabeth BAXTER M
George BAXTER 
William BAXTER 
Agnes BAXTER 
Harry BAXTER 
Albert BAXTER 
Charles W. BAXTER 

 
Common  

Marshman Houses
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 
Beccles, Suffolk, England 

35 
37 
14 
12 
10 









Head 
Wife
Son 
Son 
Daur 
Son 
Son 
Son

Marshman & Engine Driver (Sewage Works)

Printer Machine Minder
Scholar
Scholar
Scholar
Scholar

1885 
1890 
1895 
1899 
1906 SURVEY

Baxter, Jacob 
Town Council 
Town Council 
Town Council 

[1484]
[1601]
[1601]
[1716]

Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 
Beccles Town Council 

 
 
 
 

House & Bldgs
House & Bldgs
House & Bldgs
House & Bldgs

8-10s
8-10s
8-10s
8-10s

 
 

 
Common   

 

occupant 
Baxter, Jacob 

 

 
marshman

Owner 
Corporation    

 

 
dwelling 

 
 

bedrms    sitting ms      occupants
4     

 
3  
3

1914 
1922 
1927 
1936 
1948 
1954 
1965 
1974 

Baxter, Jacob 
Baxter, Jacob 
Rackham, Arthur
Rackham, Arthur
?
Powley William
Powley William
?

 
 
 
 

Corporation Marshman
Corporation Marshman
Corporation Marshman
Corporation Marshman

 
 

Island House
Island House